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St Vincent countryside that spread, first, to St Vincent’s urban areas, and then to neighbouring islands, including Grenada, and Trinidad and Tobago. Since the nineteenth century, the community has differentiated itself from the Methodists – the church that, relative to the more mainstream Anglican and Roman Catholic churches, welcomed black social outcasts – by the prominent position it accords to

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
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Frontier patterns old and new

social withdrawal Certain forms of religious adherence have, in contrast, triggered a quietist social withdrawal. For an increasing number of people in the Caribbean charismatic churches, involvement, in terms of belief system and practical support, has led to a supplanting of the State and secular politics. The Pentecostal churches are the sole exception to the decline in church attendance and

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Abandonment

goes to church, where her thoughts lead on: ‘The great ceremonial of the Mass, the singing, the incense, the benedictions, what if it was show, all useless show? What if it meant nothing, nothing?’4 Religion stands in the way of nothingness, and while it might seem that drinking is ‘wrong’ and no solution, it is apparent that staying true to all that religion offers and represents is the one thing that prevents Judith from an honest self-​ appraisal about being-​in-​the-​world-​with-​others. Religion in this society is the dominant external pressure to behave in a

in The Existential drinker
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Rainer Forst and the history of toleration

religious controversies of the pre- and early modern European ‘states’ in which they lived. As an example, consider TiC ’s fifth chapter on ‘Natural Law, Toleration, and Revolution’ which canvasses early English defenders of toleration, including Locke, before turning to Pierre Bayle. It begins with a potted history of Church–state relations in England from the Reformation to the Civil War, before turning to more and less detailed discussions of works by the Levellers Overton and Walwyn, then John Milton, William Penn and Roger Williams before turning to Locke. Locke is

in Toleration, power and the right to justification

many women held ceremonial roles, including operating as ‘Shepherdesses’ of prayer houses. These independent innovations contrasted with an exclusively masculine Methodist missionary body answerable to General Secretaries in England, and the relegation of women to minimal roles concerned with the upkeep of churches. Another feature of the sect that did not endear it to the establishment was that it

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
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For the love of God

effulgent exemplar of woman’s place in that record. Diotima is the absent presence of woman, spoken about, but not actually speaking; spoken through, but unable to speak for herself. In structural terms, she stands in a similar relation to Socrates as does the Virgin Mary to the Church Fathers. In both cases we come to understand that there is something problematic about the corporeality of woman when it comes to divinity. In order to speak of divine love, Plato suppresses Diotima’s corporeal presence, which is inseparable from her sexed body. We cannot forget that

in The subject of love

stakeholder citizenship. It is also satisfied in the context of other forms of membership. Behind the (non-state) walls, politics continues. This will be obvious to all of us in the many facets of our associative existence. Family, faculty, church, club: there are always differences of opinion on the best ways to enhance community prosperity, from the micro level on up. There is literally no community in which all members “[share] the same interests

in Democratic inclusion
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In the 1950s dame schools in St Vincent operated alongside Church-based schooling and public Government-funded schools on the island. They were home-based institutions run by one or two women, often a spinster on her own or perhaps with a sister. I know of no formal record or study of the history or nature of dame schools in the Caribbean context and certainly not in St Vincent. The following

in Frontiers of the Caribbean

regarding these conceptions. When it comes to showing due regard for the contributions of major thinkers of toleration, it is important to recognise the force as well as the limits of their arguments. John Locke is a good example. In his famous ‘Letter on Toleration’ (1689), he argues for a conception of the separation of Church and state according to which the state has the task of ensuring earthly justice, while it is left up to individuals to seek their salvation in their religious communities and to entrust themselves to God. This radicalisation of the two

in Toleration, power and the right to justification
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The life and times of Jean-Jacques Rousseau

penetrating, revealing, and at times, pathetic autobiography in the history of Western literature, namely Les Confessions. Having antagonised his former friends among the Encycloplédistes, the Genevan authorities, the Catholic Church, and just about everyone else, Rousseau did himself few favours by writing his Confessions – and his other autobiographical writings, Dialouges: Rousseau juge de Jean-Jacques (1776), Les rêveries du promeneur solitaire (1778), and his letters to the French censor Malesherbes in 1762. As Byron noted about Rousseau, in Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau