recently, however, scholars such as Alfred Stepan and Elizabeth Prodromou have suggested that there are both pragmatic and theological factors encouraging a stronger Orthodox engagement with democracy – perhaps recast and without some of the accompanying liberal assumptions – in the future. Analysing the Orthodox engagement with democracy and democratisation is far more problematic than with Western Christianity, for a number of reasons, and most sources have focused on the reasons underlying the tendency of the Orthodox churches to support

in Christianity and democratisation

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 08/05/2013, SPi 5 Parliamentary devolution, church establishment and new state religion in the UK In 1936, the historian A.L. Rowse perceived that there was a ‘slow march’ to the disestablishment of the Church of England. Yet, despite the evident and considerable social changes since then, the growth of both secularism and religious pluralism and the experiences of the newer devolved Parliament and assemblies, the Church of England remains, in the twenty-first century, as the established church of the UK and its Parliament, while the

in Monarchy, religion and the state
Open Access (free)
Interpreting Violence on Healthcare in the Early Stage of the South Sudanese Civil War

photographs gathered by UNMISS showed that the capture of Leer had been immediately followed by the destruction of large parts of the town, primarily by fire, including public infrastructure, markets, churches and local housing ( UNMISS, 2014 : 47). In the days that followed, government armed forces pursued the population in the surrounding areas, forcing the displaced, including MSF staff, to retreat deeper and deeper into the bush. After trying to hide the cars, which were quickly stolen by

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order

a majority of humanitarian practitioners, we can define it as a commitment to three things: the equal moral worth of all human lives (i.e. non-discrimination on principle), the moral priority of the claims of individuals over the authority claims of any collective entity – from nations to churches to classes to families – and a belief that as a moral commitment (one that transcends any sociological or political boundary) there is a just and legitimate reason to intervene in any and all circumstances where human beings suffer (even if

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The nature of the development-security industry

:06 Page 63 The nature of the development-security industry While groups who participate in war economies are often seen as the antitheses of legitimate state governments, it has been suggested that in some cases gangs fulfil the role of primitive states (Baumol, 1997; Skaperdas and Syropoulos, 1997). For example, drug traffickers in Latin America have contributed to social welfare programmes, with infamous drug lords such as Pablo Escobar and Roberto Suarez funding education and leisure facilities, providing scholarships and refurbishing churches (Richani, 1997

in Building a peace economy?
Abstract only
Journalism in twentieth-century Ireland

This book examines the history of journalists and journalism in twentieth century Ireland. While many media institutions have been subjected to historical scrutiny, the professional and organisational development of journalists, the changing practices of journalism, and the contribution of journalists and journalism to the evolution of modern Ireland have not. This book rectifies this deficit by mapping the development of journalism in Ireland from the late 1880s to today. Beginning with the premise that the position of journalists and the power of journalism are products of their time and are shaped by ever-shifting political, economic, technological, and cultural forces it examines the background and values of those who worked as journalists, how they viewed and understood their role over the decades, how they organised and what they stood for as a professional body, how the prevailing political and social atmosphere facilitated or constrained their work, and, crucially, how their work impacted on social change and contributed to the development of modern Ireland. Placing the experiences of journalists and the practice of journalism at the heart of its analysis it examines, for the first time, the work of journalists within the ever-changing context of Irish society. Based on strong primary research – including the previously un-consulted journals and records produced by the many journalistic representative organisations that came and went over the decades – and written in an accessible and engaging style, this book will appeal to anyone interested in journalism, history, the media, and the development of Ireland as a modern nation.

MUP FINAL PROOF – <STAGE>, 08/03/2013, SPi 7 UK state Anglican multifaithism and the Protestant monarchy While considered by many to be a ‘broad church’, the Anglicanism that provides the basis of the UK state religion is a narrow formulation within the context of the total span of Christianity and the global diversity of religious and related belief. UK monarchs have constantly been aware, at least in the last century or more, as has been shown, of the tension between the narrow and exclusive religious doctrines and rituals which legitimate their reign and

in Monarchy, religion and the state
From pious subjects to critical participants

This book examines the contribution of different Christian traditions to the waves of democratisation that have swept various parts of the world in recent decades, offering an historical overview of Christianity's engagement with the development of democracy, before focusing in detail on the period since the 1970s. Successive chapters deal with: the Roman Catholic conversion to democracy and the contribution of that church to democratisation; the Eastern Orthodox ‘hesitation’ about democracy; the alleged threat to American democracy posed by the politicisation of conservative Protestantism; and the likely impact on democratic development of the global expansion of Pentecostalism. The author draws out several common themes from the analysis of these case studies, the most important of which is the ‘liberal-democracy paradox’. This ensures that there will always be tensions between faiths which proclaim some notion of absolute truth and political order, and which are also rooted in the ideas of compromise, negotiation and bargaining.

. Religion is implicated both in questions of institutional design and in what might loosely be termed republican social politics. In this chapter, we offer a republican analysis of the constitutional framework for Church–State relations in Ireland. The provisions concerning religion in the 1937 Constitution are ambiguously poised between contradictory theoretical models: on the one hand, religion is accorded an essentially private status for most practical purposes; on the other, it is given strong symbolic recognition as a central feature of national identity, and there

in The political theory of the Irish Constitution

in both doctrine and practice within the Roman Catholic Church, changes in the policies of important external actors, and what he calls ‘snowballing’ as one regime after another tumbled from the late 1970s onwards. 1 For our purposes it is his use of the religious argument that is most interesting, and in particular the focus upon change within one particular religious tradition. The first stage of his argument here is simply to observe the strong correlation between Western Christianity and democracy and to note that of 46 democracies

in Christianity and democratisation