Knowledge institutions and the rebalancing of power, 1937– 73

From British rule the independent Irish state inherited an effectively denominational system of university education and a complementary set of science and arts institutions. Under independent rule denominational influence increased and resource starvation prevailed until the end of the 1950s. Then, as the formation of human capital, education began to be treated as an input into economic growth and American initiatives stimulated new research activity. These changes played a vital role in the rebalancing of power between the Catholic Church and the state. Social science, where the Catholic Church had been a monopoly provider, supplies a dramatic case study of the interlinking of this power shift with the process of knowledge generation.

Negotiating religious selfhoods in post-1945 England

’. Under such conditions, pondered Culhane, would Irish ‘boys and girls’, then crossing to England in their thousands, be able to preserve their faith? How is the faith of the Irish Catholic immigrants affected by this climate? Does it show something of the weakness of the hothouse plant? In a word, have many of the Irish Catholics who have went to Britain in recent years denied to the Church the benefit of the faith of their childhood? 1 For most of Culhane’s contemporaries the signs were ominous. In the sizeable literature generated around the immigrant, the

in Life history and the Irish migrant experience in post-war England

4147 Inglis–Are the Irish different_BB_Layout 1 29/07/2014 09:26 Page 99 10 Sexual abuse and the Catholic Church Marie Keenan The revelations of the Cloyne report have brought the Government, Irish Catholics and the Vatican to an unprecedented juncture. It’s fair to say that after the Ryan and Murphy Reports Ireland is, perhaps, unshockable when it comes to the abuse of children. But Cloyne has proved to be of a different order. Because for the first time in Ireland, a report into child sexual-abuse exposes an attempt by the Holy See, to frustrate an Inquiry in

in Are the Irish different?
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the working out of 210 210 Church, state and social science in Ireland the national good in the economic sphere’ (Department of Finance 1958: 9). But discord between churchmen and economic planning enthusiasts soon put in an appearance. When Patrick Lynch spoke at a Tuairim seminar in April 1959 he referred to Bishop Philbin as being ‘a distinguished source of Mr. Whitaker’s inspiration’. But he was also quoted by the Irish Times as saying that ‘we shall welcome the day when churchmen generally courageously address themselves to public affairs and indicate, by

in Church, state and social science in Ireland

3995 Migrations.qxd:text 5/8/13 11:39 Page 55 3 Migrant integration and the ‘network-making power’ of the Irish Catholic Church Breda Gray Introduction In this chapter I discuss the Irish Catholic Church as both a bureaucratic hierarchal institution and transnational network that promotes migrant integration and welfare via ‘network-making power’ (Castells, 2009, 2011). The Catholic Church has always channelled flows of religious values, information and people. However, my focus here is on the network-making power of the Irish Catholic Church in shaping the

in Migrations
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1 1 Introduction Knowledge, they say, is power. One manifestation of the power of the Catholic Church within the independent Irish state in the middle decades of the twentieth century was the virtual monopoly its clergy and the educational institutions under their control possessed over the discipline of sociology.The first university posts in this discipline were filled in 1937, the year in which the voters of the twenty-​six-​county state ratified a new constitution that blended Anglo-​American liberal democratic norms with distinctive new provisions

in Church, state and social science in Ireland
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The empirical turn of Irish Catholic sociology in the 1950s

Peter McKevitt resigned from his post in Maynooth to become parish priest of Termonfeckin. While the bishops had decided to shelve his 1939 proposals for the initiation of a Scheme of Catholic Action for Ireland, McKevitt on his return from Rome ‘threw himself into the activities of the Christus Rex Society as well as teaching the social encyclicals of the church to students preparing to become priests’ (B. Conway 2011:  42). Created in 1941, and formally approved by the hierarchy in 1945, the Christus Rex Society restricted its membership to diocesan clergy and

in Church, state and social science in Ireland

failed in its positive goal of bringing a vocationalist Irish social infrastructure into being. Moreover the Irish Catholic Church was divided during the early decades of Irish independent statehood by critiques of banking and finance capital formulated within this movement and ecclesiastical disciplinary mechanisms were invoked to hierarchically silence some of its radical voices. During the Second World War/​Emergency changes in the wider world and developments within Irish politics provided Ireland’s Catholic social movement with an alternative focus around which it

in Church, state and social science in Ireland

World War Throughout the Second World War southern Ireland pursued a policy of neutrality that enjoyed broad popular support but exposed a small state to intense 106 106 Church, state and social science in Ireland pressure from Great Power belligerents. Its economy was severely disrupted during these years by an inability to import fuel, agricultural inputs and industrial raw materials. This situation was exacerbated by Britain’s ‘fitful efforts to use control of supplies as a lever to secure Irish concessions on strategic questions’ (O’Halpin 2002:  300)  –​a

in Church, state and social science in Ireland

factors, affecting productivity in Irish industry and agriculture’.1 During the first half 1960s the unenclosed field of social research was to be the subject of a series of proposals to a variety of government departments for the creation of research centres or institutes. The chapter details these proposals, the fate they met and the context in which the Irish government moved to fill the infrastructural gap that had been left in the social research field by replacing ERI 140 140 Church, state and social science in Ireland with an economic and social research

in Church, state and social science in Ireland