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Adapting the metaphor of psychopathology to look back at the mad, monstrous 80s

Love is hard to find/In the church of the poison mind. Culture Club This chapter examines American Psycho (2000) and Donnie Darko (2001), two films that look back at aspects of the American experience in the 1980s. These titles represent only two out of a larger series of recent ‘Monstrous 80s’ films

in Monstrous adaptations

these narratives are analysed, which will be parsed out in topics. The first topic has to do with Record TV’s initiative to focus on a niche audience as a strategy to compete with the hegemony of Globo’s telenovelas. The second topic expatiates on the connection between the network owners and the Universal Church of the Kingdom of God (UCKG), one of the branches of the Evangelical faith that has attracted many followers in Brazil in recent years. The third and final topic relates those two previous points to the emergence of a conservative audience who consume

in The Bible onscreen in the new millennium
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Lacanian discourse has a complex and multiplies determined relationship with Catholicism, and Robert Bresson has the reputation of being the cinema's greatest Catholic director. Few Catholic artists, however, have found the institutional life of 'their' Church a congenial or inspirational topic, and its declining importance in Bresson's later work is not of itself particularly surprising. Pascal's wager on the existence of God has what contemporary linguistics might call a performative effect, for it is only thanks to the wager that God's existence becomes certain and available to the believer. Bresson's first film, Affaires publiques, is in many ways as unBressonian a work as could be imagined. Bresson from Journal onwards works to all intents and purposes outside genre, with the exception of those parts of Pickpocket and the inserts in Le Diable probablement that are close to the documentary. In 1947, Bresson went to Rome to work on a screenplay of the life of St Ignatius Loyola, founder of the Jesuits, which was never to be filmed. Un Condamné à mort s'est échappé, released in 1956, was and remains Bresson's most commercially successful and critically best-received film, though curiously for a very long time it was unavailable in Britain. Bresson's next two films, his first in colour, are also his first true adaptations from Dostoevsky. Bresson's final film, shot in the summer of 1982 and released in 1983, brought to an end the longest gap in his work since that separating Journal from Les Dames, more than thirty years before.

basis of the church’s authority. Reluctantly, the pope agrees that Galileo must be shown the instruments of torture. On 22 June 1633, as Virginia prays for her father’s abjuration, the tolling of the big bell of St Marcus solemnly announces his recantation. Galileo enters, a broken man, to Andrea’s eternal disgust: ‘Pity the country that has no heroes!’ cries the boy. ‘No. Pity the country that needs heroes’, replies Galileo

in Joseph Losey
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of the bureaucracy, of the police, of the Church, of intellectuals, of the media). The reality of Italy was a reality of disunity set against an ideal ‘fascist’ Italy of cultural and economic homogeneity for which language was an indicator (‘Italian’ a sign for unity, the nation; plural languages a sign of differences, backwardness, opposition to the nation for reasons of class). The contradictory aspect is that however realistic dialect may be it was a sign of separation and isolation, especially so in conditions where Italian was being promoted as dominant and

in Film modernism
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, subsequently dwindles to near-invisibility. Few Catholic artists, however, have found the institutional life of ‘their’ Church a congenial or inspirational topic, and its declining importance in Bresson’s later work is not of itself particularly surprising. That his work becomes more pessimistic in the course of his career is scarcely open to doubt, but the deepening disenchantment it shows with developments in contemporary society

in Robert Bresson
A mixed-method analysis of online community perception of epic biblical movies

largely under wraps (Hall 2002 ). This group was reached through ‘their respective clergy, their sermons, and, in 1933, for the first time, by direct mail campaigns’ (Maresco 2004 : 2). The key to the success of The Passion of the Christ rested on this audience. According to Caldwell ( 2004 ), the studios conceptualised a ‘Christian audience comprised of Evangelicals, conservative Roman Catholics, and Charismatics’ (Maresco 2004 : 5). By reaching out through pastors and churches, they were able to leverage Christians with their marketing machine. Nothing like The

in The Bible onscreen in the new millennium

Introduction Once again a more detailed plotline is required since Glory! Glory! is not publicly available. For decades charismatic Reverend Dan Stuckey (Barry Morse) has led the Church of the Companions of Christ, loyally supported by his ever-present financial manager Lester Babbit (James Whitmore). The church televises the Reverend’s evangelism, an immensely successful spiritual

in Lindsay Anderson
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ramifications of religious fundamentalism. Inter alia he interviewed ‘born-again’ Christians, looked at the careers of 107 108 The documentary diaries Jim and Tammy Bakker, and the pursuit of money under the guise of requesting religious donations. In a later film Celibacy, Antony investigated the whole question of celibacy for ordained clergy in the Catholic church. In his opinion the thousand year-old doctrine had parallels in the Church’s attack on Galileo, who argued the earth went round the sun, not vice versa. Eventually the church came round to acknowledging

in The documentary diaries
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, literary, beautiful – never attains its apparent end of clarification and explanation (its rationality and orderliness literally goes nowhere). To the contrary, what is left is a labyrinth of stories, interwoven fates, questions, possible pathways, hypothetical relations, at best separate disjoined narratives seeking explanations that prove elusive. The monk who initiates the inquest is burned at the stake Realism (1)177 by the Church for offering a view of the collapse of the bridge and the reasons for it that the Church regarded as unacceptable. The project of the

in Film modernism