Search results

Adapting the metaphor of psychopathology to look back at the mad, monstrous 80s

Love is hard to find/In the church of the poison mind. Culture Club This chapter examines American Psycho (2000) and Donnie Darko (2001), two films that look back at aspects of the American experience in the 1980s. These titles represent only two out of a larger series of recent ‘Monstrous 80s’ films

in Monstrous adaptations
Abstract only
Catholicism as System in Charles Maturin‘s Melmoth the Wanderer

This essay casts a new light on the anti-Catholicism of Charles Robert Maturin‘s gothic novel Melmoth the Wanderer by reading it as part of a larger assault on systems in the wake of the French Revolution. Maturin‘s attack on the stupendous system of Catholicism contributes to a broader conservative polemic against all forms of international governance. Melmoth the Wanderer‘s portrait of the Church offers us an early instance of modern conservatisms archnemesis: an international system that conspires to rule the world.

Gothic Studies
Abstract only
St Michael and All Angels, Sowton and St Mary the Virgin, Ottery St Mary

THIS CHAPTER will explore how windows were used in two specific ecclesiastical interiors and what aspirations patrons and architects had for the stained glass in these churches. The preceding case studies have examined how glass-painters made and promoted their windows and it is now necessary to look at stained glass from the patron’s perspective. The two glazing projects described in this chapter

in Stained Glass and the Victorian Gothic Revival

observations as they relate to issues of adaptation, the visual lexicon, and literacy. I included five illustrated abridged editions in my sample group: The Step-Up Classic Chillers edition adapted by Larry Weinberg and illustrated by Ken Barr (1982), the Peter Bedrick Books edition abridged by Wendy Hobson and illustrated by Caroline Church (1989), the Great Illustrated Classics edition adapted by Malvina G. Vogel and illustrated by Pablo Marcos Studio (1993), the Oxford Bookworms Library edition retold by Patrick Nobes and including illustrations by Lynd Ward (2001), and

in Adapting Frankenstein

IN THE HANDS of a clergyman like John Edwin Lance, stained glass was more than just decoration. In his newly rebuilt church at Buckland St Mary in Somerset, he used stained glass to vary the quality of the light entering the building, and so change our experience of the interior. Richly painted windows surrounding the chancel and baptistry announce that here are the key liturgical areas, while the

in Stained Glass and the Victorian Gothic Revival
Adaptive symbiosis and Peake’s Presumption, or the fate of Frankenstein

Frankenstein and the Creature as doppelgangers. Bloom centres that reading in critical Frankenstein studies: ‘A critical discussion of Frankenstein needs to begin from an insight first recorded by Richard Church and Muriel Spark: the monster and his creator are the antithetical halves of a single being’ ( Shelley’s Frankenstein 2). Here we see yet another facet of adaptation: critical interpretations or readings as adaptations (Stam 62–3). Significantly, Bloom’s ‘first’ recordings of the doppelganger reading appear decades apart, Church’s in 1928 ( Mary Shelley ) and

in Adapting Frankenstein

. 9.4 The recognisably Swedish house where Daniel can be assumed to live in Year Walk (Simago, 2013, Year Walk ). During this nightly walk, Daniel encounters a series of beings from Nordic mythology, including the Hulder, the brook horse, the Myling, the Night Raven and the Church Grim. 16 The gamer who controls Daniel progresses through the game by

in Nordic Gothic
Abstract only
Running into the forest in Russian fairy tales

up or prettify them for children. 7 His stories, pagan in tone, eventually fell under the scrutiny of the Russian Orthodox Church, and Afanas’ev was punished for failing to censor his material. Fired from his clerical job by Alexander II, subjected to poverty and ignominy, he died of consumption at the age of forty-five. 8 Afanas’ev's fairy tale and folktale collections are still primary source material for Russian folklorists. In Afanas

in In the company of wolves

supernatural and horrific. In addition, as an ironic play with the conventions of vampire fiction, Blackeberg is described as fully secularised: ‘You were beyond the grasp of the mysteries of the past; there wasn't even a church. Nine thousand inhabitants and no church.’  6 In part, Låt den rätte komma in portrays the less fortunate. A parallel plot to the main narrative of the vampire Eli and the boy Oskar depicts a group of drinking buddies, living more or less on the margins of society: the cat hoarder Göran, ‘Karlsson

in Nordic Gothic
Abstract only
Places and spaces in Johan Theorin’s Öland quartet series

were disturbed by an old spinster. Her clock had stopped, so she got up too early and went to church in the middle of the night on Christmas Eve. There was the murmur of voices as if there were a service going on, and the church was full of people. Suddenly the old woman caught sight of her fiancé from the days of her youth. He had drowned many years ago, but there he was, sitting in a pew among the others. 9

in Nordic Gothic