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Richard Farmer

Britons, the cinema’s position as a for-profit industry tended to militate against its claims to be acting in or for the public interest being taken entirely at face value; no one questioned the repair of churches, but then again, churches did not have shareholders. The massive growth in tickets sales after 1939 might also have counted against the exhibitors: their industry had done very well during the war, proving itself to be very profitable even in circumstances when, in a material sense, it was down on its uppers. Other factors were also taken into consideration

in Cinemas and cinemagoing in wartime Britain, 1939–45
Stuart Hanson

manage without a cinema’ and that as houses were built and new communities created, the cinemas came ‘often enough before the churches: they were part of the very fabric of the new suburbia’. 24 As a 1935 editorial in The Cinema Architect and Builder opined: What other industry in the country is building so extensively as this of ours? Excepting private dwelling

in From silent screen to multi-screen
Abstract only
Jeffrey Richards

) and heterosexual romance (Vin and Carol fall in love and marry). It highlights in particular the role of the mother – as home-maker, as support for her husband and children but also as active participant in the war effort (she captures a downed German airman). It focuses on a cohesive local community, featuring village, church, flower show. The programme personalizes the British war effort by focusing on a family with which the American audiences can identify

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60
Abstract only
Jeffrey Richards

Coughlin, the ‘radio priest’, a Catholic cleric who had a broadcasting tower built next to his church and was a forerunner of the later televangelists. Both were violently anti-Roosevelt and both expert broadcasters with wide appeal. Long felt the ‘New Deal’ did not go far enough and campaigned against concentrated wealth in his ‘Share the Wealth Association’ and Coughlin denounced ‘Communists, Jews, socialists, capitalists and international bankers

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60
Stuart Hanson

such as Westerns and adventures, Rank established the Children’s Entertainment Film (CEF) division in 1944. The content of the films was subject to the control of the CEF’s director, Mary Field, and a Youth Advisory Council, made up of representatives from the BBC, the education sector and the church, amongst others. They were concerned that the films ‘would not only be entertaining but would also set a high moral tone and

in From silent screen to multi-screen
Jeffrey Richards

There was also strict censorship, with sex, politics, race, religion, profanity and bodily functions all banned. When Mae West and Don Ameche performed an Adam and Eve sketch on The Edgar Bergen Show in 1937, there was an outcry. The Catholic Church threatened a boycott of Chase and Sanborn Coffee, the programme’s sponsor, and there was a formal investigation by the Federal Communications Commission. As a result Mae West was off the air for the next 37 years

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60
Cinemagoing in the blitz
Richard Farmer

physical and psychological refuges where patrons should, if only for a few brief hours, be able to find some sort of respite from the war. This was, of course, simply not a realistic possibility in many areas of Britain. Although German (and, indeed, British) aircrew sought out targets with military, industrial or logistical importance, bombs dropped from aeroplanes were notoriously difficult to control. Homes, churches and leisure facilities were hit regularly, especially in working-class areas where places of work and rest were crowded together cheek-by-jowl.7 Cinemas

in Cinemas and cinemagoing in wartime Britain, 1939–45
Richard Farmer

evident in Coleshill’s original letter.37 Neither the religious language found in these letters – ‘I sincerely think that they are a second church … God bless those who make moving pictures’; ‘I pray they will continue to flourish’ – nor the upbeat tone of some correspondents is able to hide the fact that during the war the cinema was something for which many people were pitifully and pathetically grateful. Certain themes get repeated in the letters, and these themes speak to preoccupations and dangers, both physical and psychological, then prevalent in the world

in Cinemas and cinemagoing in wartime Britain, 1939–45
Stuart Hanson

larger site in Paris, appropriately located behind a deserted church and graveyard. His presentations got more sophisticated – he claimed he could ‘bring the dead back to life’ – but it became clear that he was not the sole exponent of this new form of public entertainment. Despite efforts to patent the apparatus, which were ultimately unsuccessful, the phantasmagoria spread and its popularity was prolific. The first

in From silent screen to multi-screen