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Brian Sudlow

The second problem alluded to in the introduction to the last chapter was how buffered individuality reinforced the paradigm of the individual as radically autonomous. Cavanaugh’s analysis of the secular State indicates the role such individualism played in the genesis of contractual political theories. What he calls the mythos of the secular city was built on the ‘assumption of the essential individuality of the human race’, rather than on its essential unity or potential to be gathered in unity into the Church. 1

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Brian Sudlow

-relativism? And if not, on what grounds can we situate it? The response to these questions lies in the kind of gathering or community which the Church represents to the French and English Catholic writers, and in how they reacted to, and portrayed, its organisation and internal life. Here we can once more refer to Charles Taylor’s analysis of secularisation in which the model of the buffered individual poses two problems for religion when it is considered corporately. The first is that the buffered individual’s mind-centred view of reality tends to

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Alison Morgan

the reform of both the church and the state, so often regarded as colluding in the repression of the people; however, there is a degree of cynicism directed at Hunt and, through the comparison with Cromwell, the poet appears to be suggesting that Hunt would adopt the trappings of ­monarchy just as Cromwell did. In sixteen hundred and forty one,57 The radicals had some famous fun; MORGAN 9781784993122 PRINT.indd 73 23/04/2018 15:53 74 Ballads and songs of Peterloo Till with King CHARLES they so merrily sped, The first took his Crown and then his Head.      Then

in Ballads and songs of Peterloo
Alison Morgan

volunteers who were sufficiently wealthy to buy the necessary horse, they were held up to ridicule by reformers as “feather-bed soldiers” or “the church and guts mob”’.14 Variously described as ‘bloodhounds’, ‘butchers’ and ‘assassins’, many of the poems focus on the cowardice of the ‘flush’d and drunk’ MYC:15 When first your slumb’ring weapons active grown, Weapons whose force no foreign foe has known. Distress’d, defenceless Britons, hack’d and hew’d. And dy’d their maiden blades in women’s blood;16 The pointed alliterative statement in the second line highlighting the

in Ballads and songs of Peterloo
Brian Sudlow

anthropocentric, melioristic and, with regard to religion, increasingly pluralist, indifferentist and sometimes even hostile. Reading French and English Catholic writers from this perspective yields much of interest. They make a variety of attempts to associate the Church with the secular political dispensations in which they were living – the problem was in fact how to resacralise the State – without at the same time undermining their religion by subjecting it to the legitimisation of the secular State. Crucially, most did not attempt to resacralise

in Catholic literature and secularisation in France and England, 1880–1914
Abstract only
Alison Morgan

and headed by a boroughreeve to ensure parliamentary law was adhered to, church leaders and magistrates were key figures in maintaining law and order. On a visit in 1837, the reformer, Richard Cobden, noted that the inhabitants were ‘living under the feudal system’.8 Despite this ‘leisurely regime’, as described by Frank O’Gorman, Stuart Hylton notes some good examples of public services, such as hospitals, the asylum and public baths, all built at the end of the eighteenth century.9 Accompanying the difficulties posed by a country moving swiftly from an agrarian

in Ballads and songs of Peterloo
Alison Morgan

land, Your smiling babes shall hail the suspicious reign, Of Liberty, and ENGLAND’S RIGHTS MAINTAIN. 4  ‘Elegiac Apostrophe to the Memory of the Unfortunate Persons Who Were Killed at Manchester, on 16th of August’ This poem first appeared in the Black Dwarf on 6 October, followed three days later by publication in the Briton.37 The editor of the latter may simply have copied it from the former or the anonymous poet could have sent copies to both periodicals. The attack on the legal system and the church demonstrate, in a manner similar to Shelley in ‘England in

in Ballads and songs of Peterloo
Alison Morgan

obtaining a Christian burial at St. Mary Matfelon Church in Whitechapel (J. Dugan, The Great Mutiny (London: Andre Deutsch, 1965), pp. 364–9). 52 Shelley’s refrain from The Masque of Anarchy bears a striking resemblance to the ballad’s opening line: ‘Rise like lions after slumber’. 53 See the Introduction for information on Henry Hunt. Sir Charles Wolseley (1769–1846) was a leader of the reform movement and founder, along with Major Cartwright, of the Hampden Clubs. He helped the victims of Peterloo and their families and attended some of the trials. Following a speech

in Ballads and songs of Peterloo
Alison Morgan

more details. 37 Manchester Observer (18 September 1819), p. 718; Medusa, 1:37 (1819), p. 296. 38 This newspaper cutting is part of a collection held at the Working-Class Movement Library in Salford (S52). 39 St Peter’s field was named after the church which was built there in 1788. It was demolished in 1907. 40 Contemporaneous cartoons, such as Cruikshank’s Massacre at St Peter’s, depict the MYC in blue uniforms. 41 The lion has been a feature of the British royal coat of arms since the reign of Richard I or Lionheart at the end of the twelfth century. In

in Ballads and songs of Peterloo
Alison Morgan

Chapter 2, number 2. 19 See number 10 below. 20 Medusa, 1:32 (1819), p. 355. 21 Copies can be found in Preston Harris Library (Harkness Collection, vol. B); Manchester Central Library Collection (1819/2/W) and Madden Collection, University of Cambridge (no. 203). The imprints by Harkness from Church Street, Preston are dated between 1840 and 1866. The song can also be found in Curiosities of Street Literature, a collection of broadsides published anonymously in 1871 (Anon. (London: Reeves and Turner, 1871, p. 98), evidence of its continued popularity. Two of the

in Ballads and songs of Peterloo