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In recent years, exhumation campaigns of mass graves resulting from the armed conflict (1980–2000) between the Maoist guerrillas of PCP-Shining Path (Sendero Luminoso) and the States armed forces have increased in Peru. People in rural Andes, the most marginalised sectors of national society, which were also particularly affected by the war, are the main group concerned with exhumations. This article examines the handling, flow and re-appropriation of exhumed human remains in public space to inform sociopolitical issues underlying the reparation policies implemented by the State, sometimes with the support of human rights NGOs. How do the families of victims become involved in this unusual return of their dead? Have the exhumations become a new repertoire of collective action for Andean people seeking to access their fundamental rights and for recognition of their status as citizens? Finally, what do these devices that dignify the dead reveal about the internal workings of Peruvian society – its structural inequities and racism – which permeate the social fabric?

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal

The article will present the findings of ethnographic research into the Colombian and Mexican forensic systems, introducing the first citizen-led exhumation project made possible through the cooperation of scholars, forensic specialists and interested citizens in Mexico. The coupling evolution and mutual re-constitution of forensic science will be explored, including new forms of citizenship and nation building projects – all approached as lived experience – in two of Latin America‘s most complex contexts: organised crime and mass death.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal

being in the world. This could be the intersection of data and citizenship, the relationship between data and bodies or the construction of value in relation to data. They are also asked to identify places of data resistance. At the end of a walk, where the groups have been asked to document their movement with a map, observations, collection of physical objects, they need to tell others a story of their journey. Data walking can be used as a tool for civic engagement (Balastrini 2017), or within a broader set of reflections on specific social or economic processes

in Ethnography for a data-saturated world
Open Access (free)
Deaths at sea and unidentified bodies in Lesbos

were born in Greece but the family had decided to return to Syria some years before. Their deaths could have been avoided had a new Greek citizenship law – relaxing criteria for the acquisition of Greek citizenship to children of immigrants born in Greece – been implemented (Christopoulos 2012).2 The two girls could have legally entered the country as Greek citizens, instead of risking their lives to cross the militarised border illegally. These three deaths reflect the biopolitical power of the two key instruments of contemporary sovereign states, namely control

in Migrating borders and moving times
Open Access (free)
Borders, ticking clocks and timelessness among temporary labour migrants in Israel

raised families in Israel. Although they live on the periphery of Israeli society, children of some migrants – the Israeli Interior Ministry estimates there are about 1,200 children of migrant workers in Israel and an additional 2,000 of refugees/asylum-seekers – self-identify as Israelis and are being socialised as Israelis through the school system (Zubida et al. 2013). Many are stateless, as there are few means to adjust their status and to claim Israeli citizenship or to claim the citizenship of their parents’ countries of origin. Some 600 are awaiting adjudication

in Migrating borders and moving times
Mass graves in post-war Malaysia

motherland, especially in light of the recent establishment of the communist People’s Republic of China? Or perhaps it was to emphasize that the Chinese migrant community aspired towards being peaceful, law-abiding citizens of a future Malaya, quite separate from the wayward communist ‘bandits’ who were threatening peace in the territory.22 In the decades following independence in 1957, and partially in response to the communist threat of the Malayan Emergency, large numbers of the Chinese migrant population were granted citizenship in an effort to domesticate them. Did

in Human remains and identification
Open Access (free)
Tracing relatedness and diversity in the Albanian–Montenegrin borderland

.g. Yuval-Davis 2011) manner, where citizenship, cross-border migration background, gender, bilingualism and political and ideological positions also play a vital role. The chapter thus follows the call to take seriously the salience of ethno-nationalism in the Balkans, while accepting the need to go ‘beyond’ conventional analyses (e.g. Verdery 1994; Duijzings 2003; Bougarel et al. 2007; Tošić 2015a) and avoiding the reproduction of the Balkanist stereotype of the ethno-national ‘powder keg’. I conclude by suggesting that the kind of inclusive diversity pattern revealed

in Migrating borders and moving times
Open Access (free)
Crossing borders, changing times

of citizenship, makes it difficult for migrants with non-Jewish beliefs to integrate and to enter the same time-space as its citizens. Harper and Zubida (Chapter 5) explore precisely these relationships between labour migrants in Israel and their subjective apprehension and organisation of time. They build on the idea of a border as defining a given time-space and of border crossing as generating new concepts of time. Migrants, they argue, do not always march to the same clock as citizens (even as the atomisation of individuals associated with neoliberalism

in Migrating borders and moving times
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-familiar dependency’. Contrasting this socialist paternalism to the two meanings of the nation that Eric Hobsbawm had previously identified, namely citizenship and ethnicity, Verdery writes, instead of political or ethnocultural rights, it posited a moral tie linking subjects with the state through their rights to share in the redistributed social product. Subjects were presumed to be neither politically active, not ethnically similar to each other: they were presumed to be grateful recipients – like small children in a family – of benefits their rulers decide upon for them. The

in Politics of waiting
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Death, landscape and power among the Duha Tuvinians of northern Mongolia

the Duha seem not to have posed any actual contagious risk, as traditionally they must take place far away from human settlement and the corpses are usually eaten by wild predators – and thus quickly disposed of. Between 1954 and 1956 the Duha, who had formerly lived as stateless forest dwellers in the taiga areas of Russian Tuva and northern Mongolia, gained Mongolian citizenship. With their new legal status followed dramatic changes in their traditional livelihood; their reindeer were collectivised and only a limited number of people remained in the taiga to look

in Governing the dead