Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 130 items for :

  • "citizenship" x
  • Manchester Security, Conflict & Peace x
Clear All
Authors: Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

This book explores how different publics make sense of and evaluate anti-terrorism powers within the UK, and the implications of this for citizenship and security.

Since 9/11, the UK’s anti-terrorism framework has undergone dramatic changes, including with the introduction of numerous new pieces of legislation. Drawing on primary empirical research, this book examines the impact of these changes on security and citizenship, as perceived by citizens themselves. We examine such impacts on different communities within the UK, and find that generally, whilst white individuals were not unconcerned about the effects of anti-terrorism, ethnic minority citizens (and not Muslim communities alone) believe that anti-terrorism measures have had a direct, negative impact on various dimensions of their citizenship and security.

This book thus offers the first systematic engagement with ‘vernacular’ or ‘everyday’ understandings of anti-terrorism policy, citizenship and security. Beyond an empirical analysis of citizen attitudes, it argues that while transformations in anti-terrorism frameworks impact on public experiences of security and citizenship, they do not do so in a uniform, homogeneous, or predictable manner. At the same time, public understandings and expectations of security and citizenship themselves shape how developments in anti-terrorism frameworks are discussed and evaluated. The relationships between these phenomenon, in other words, are both multiple and co-constitutive. By detailing these findings, this book adds depth and complexity to existing studies of the impact of anti-terrorism powers.

The book will be of interest to a wide range of academic disciplines including Political Science, International Relations, Security Studies and Sociology.

Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

(frequently) variable ways (see also Jarvis and Lister 2015a ). In order to assess these impacts upon security and citizenship more specifically, this chapter offers a brief overview of our own approach to these complex and contested concepts. We begin by exploring how recent scholarship on security has sought, first, to escape the state-centrism of earlier work in this area and, second, to examine the

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

This chapter follows the previous discussion of public evaluations of anti-terrorism powers by examining the impact thereof on citizens and citizenship more specifically. Two main findings from our research are discussed. First, that anti-terrorism powers have impacted – variably – on four key aspects of citizenship: rights, participation, identity and duties. As

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

In preceding chapters, we explored the different ways in which citizens conceive of security and insecurity, and the ways in which anti-terrorism powers are interpreted and evaluated by UK publics, including in relation to their impacts on aspects of citizenship. In this chapter, we now bring these analyses together, examining the relationship between conceptions or

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Abstract only
Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

; Sivanandan 2006 ; Waldron 2003 ) have pointed, in contrast, to the pernicious implications of such measures for fundamental principles of democratic life, decrying those agitating for their sacrifice in a misguided quest for greater security. Why citizenship? Why security? For a book concerned with the development and experience of anti

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Abstract only
Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

At the book’s outset, we identified four research questions underpinning our exploration of anti-terrorism powers, citizenship and security in the United Kingdom. First, how are contemporary anti-terrorism powers understood, assessed and discussed by different publics across the UK? Second, how do anti-terrorism powers affect the experience of citizenship within the UK

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Anti-terrorism powers and vernacular (in)securities
Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

The two preceding chapters focused on public understandings of anti-terrorism policy and the implications of these for the status and practice of citizenship. As we saw, and perhaps as we might expect, there is no unidirectional relationship between these entities. While many people in the UK feel that their experience of citizenship has been adversely affected by developments

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

, presents scope for exploring changes in practices and experiences of citizenship. This, we suggested, becomes especially significant if we approach citizenship as a performative, lived phenomenon rather than solely a formal legal status. In this chapter we begin our attempt to explore these dynamics, by setting out the diversity of perspectives we encountered in relation to the UK

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Historical trends and contemporary issues
Lee Jarvis and Michael Lister

citizenship. It is, though, briefly worth noting two arguments about the UK’s post-9/11 measures, to which we return in greater detail below. First, as Walker ( 2002 ) argues, the very existence of so much legislation should itself be seen as some form of failure. As he suggests, one of the aims of the 2000 Terrorism Act was to put UK anti-terrorism law on a permanent, stable, footing. That such a significant

in Anti-terrorism, citizenship and security
Terrorism, parliament and the ritual of proscription
Authors: Lee Jarvis and Tim Legrand

Banning them, securing us offers a rich and expansive exploration of the politics of proscribing – or banning – terrorist organisations in Britain. The book calls attention to the remarkable, and overlooked, role of proscription debates and decisions in contemporary UK politics. Using primary empirical research, the book shows how parliamentary processes of proscribing ‘illegitimate’ organisations is as much a ritual performance as it is a technique for countering political violence. This ritual, we argue, is a performance of sovereignty and powerful framing of Britain as a liberal, democratic, moderate space. Yet, it represents a paradox too. For proscription’s processes have limited democratic or judicial oversight, and its outcomes pose significant threats to democratic norms, human rights, political dissent and citizenship more broadly.

The book breaks important new ground on the politics of terrorism, counter-terrorism, security and democracy. It will be widely read by researchers and students across Security Studies, International Relations, Political Science, History, Sociology and beyond.