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Open Access (free)
Integrating historical and archaeological evidence for reproduction in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries
Elizabeth Craig-Atkins
and
Mary E. Fissell

significant are scattered stories of individuals contravening or contesting those rules, which afford glimpses of the meanings of death and burial for people whose beliefs and attitudes are otherwise unknown. These small stories may challenge casual assumptions about the significance of infant loss for working-class families who experienced high rates of infant mortality. Similarly, from an archaeological perspective, consideration of the information that can be obtained from such skeletal remains, alongside funerary and burial evidence, enriches and problematises this

in The material body
Anna M. Davies-Barrett
and
Sarah A. Inskip

reliance on these led to large gaps in our knowledge of the social components of tobacco use, such as who used it, why and what its effects were on the body. Further, more recent narratives about tobacco use are mostly drawn from the perspectives of middle- to upper-class white, ‘literate’ men, especially from urban centres. One way to reassess current narratives is to take a multidisciplinary approach and draw on the various sources of evidence for tobacco use that exist for England. In this chapter, we aim to bring various strands of information

in The material body
Cultural historical and osteoarchaeological perspectives
Sophie L. Newman
and
David M. Turner

understandings of both the ‘process’ of ageing and the ‘condition’ of disability are contextual and change over time (Appleby, 2018 : 145; Woodward, 2015 : 34). As Gowland points out, the meaning of disablement is not only culturally specific, but also dependent on a range of factors including the construction of particular disease states, the class, gender, age, religious and racial identity of the person concerned, expectations of that person's performance of capabilities pertinent to their identity or stage of their life course, and social, cultural and familial factors

in The material body
Open Access (free)
Embodiment, history and archaeology in industrialising England, 1700–1850

The Material Body exploits the possibilities of studying the material body in the past primarily through the sources and approaches of archaeology, history and material culture studies. Together, these seven chapters draw upon collections of human remains, material culture and documentary evidence from Britain during the period 1700–1850; major themes are gender, class, age, disability and maternity. Some contributions are co-authored by a historian and archaeologist; others are single authored. But each chapter explores the lived experiences of the material body drawing on disciplines which share an interest in the material or embodied turn. The volume demonstrates new interdisciplinary ways of looking at experiences of the body. It brings together archaeological and historical data to reconstruct embodied experiences and represents the first collection of genuinely collaborative scholarship by historians and archaeologists.

Abstract only
Audiences and objects
Samuel J.M.M. Alberti

the core of the Manchester Museum were accessed principally by the members of the Manchester Natural History Society, up to 30,000 visits were made annually from the 1830s. In the mid-century, as discussed in chapter 1, the Society also sought to attract ‘working classes and the young people of the district’.3 By the 1860s, however, these numbers had dwindled, and there is no evidence that the citizenry of Manchester missed the collections as they sat in the Owens College attic for twenty years after the transfer from the Natural History Society. And yet the late

in Nature and culture
Open Access (free)
Body and experience in the archaeological and historical record
Karen Harvey

in the ability to sustain and successfully manage a household of which one was head (Harvey, 2012 ; Shepard, 2000 ). For the consolidating middle class, their young men were the future (Barker, 2008 ; Davidoff and Hall, 2002 : 416–49). It was into this world that James Simpson was born on 26 December 1815. He was the first son of Robert and Rebecca (neé Blacktin) Simpson (then aged 24 and 20 respectively), who had been married less than a year when their son arrived. Robert hailed from Wirksworth in Yorkshire, while Rebecca had been born in Cheshire. They were

in The material body
Art, process, archaeology

This book presents a study of material images and asks how an appreciation of the making and unfolding of images and art alters archaeological accounts of prehistoric and historic societies. With contributions focusing on case studies including prehistoric Britain, Scandinavia, Iberia, the Americas and Dynastic Egypt, and including contemporary reflections on material images, it makes a novel contribution to ongoing debates relating to archaeological art and images. The book offers a New Materialist analysis of archaeological imagery, with an emphasis on considering the material character of images and their making and unfolding. The book reassesses the predominantly representational paradigm of archaeological image analysis and argues for the importance of considering the ontology of images. It considers images as processes or events and introduces the verb ‘imaging’ to underline the point that images are conditions of possibility that draw together differing aspects of the world. The book is divided into three sections: ‘Emergent images’, which focuses on practices of making; ‘Images as process’, which examines the making and role of images in prehistoric societies; and ‘Unfolding images’, which focuses on how images change as they are made and circulated. The book features contributions from archaeologists, Egyptologists, anthropologists and artists. The contributors to the book highlight the multiple role of images in prehistoric and historic societies, demonstrating that archaeologists need to recognise the dynamic and changeable character of images.

Open Access (free)
The material body in archaeology and history
Elizabeth Craig-Atkins
and
Karen Harvey

, gender, class and disability – the book highlights the structures of matter, thought, culture and power through which these experiences were formed. This interdisciplinary and embodied approach, created by bringing historical and archaeological disciplines into explicit dialogue, allows us to better account for the experiences of men, women and children in the past. The collection comprises seven chapters that study the body using documentary evidence alongside collections of human remains and material culture from Britain during the period 1700

in The material body
Learning from experiment and experience
Rosalind Janssen

The name of Professor Rosalie David will forever be associated with her exploration of diverse aspects of Egyptian medicine, her pioneering work on Petrie’s Kahun material, together with her exemplary promotion of lifelong learning. This article seeks to acknowledge and seamlessly combine all three aspects. Using equivalent ingredients to those in prescriptions Ebers 783 and Kahun 22, namely acacia gum capsules, natural carob drops, dates and honey, together with modern pestles and mortars, a contraceptive was recreated as a paired task at classes conducted by the author at both Oxford University’s Department of Continuing Studies (OUDCE) and at the City Literacy Institute (City Lit). The concoctions produced as a result of this paired task were each placed on lint and engendered lively debate as to the contraceptive’s alleged up to three year efficacy. An educational analysis in the final section of the paper explores the value of experimental archaeology in encouraging mature students to engage in deep meta-learning.

in Mummies, magic and medicine in ancient Egypt
Open Access (free)
Duncan Sayer

the gender display within. Indeed, subtle questions like attitudes to gender in the past cannot be understood unless the social context is first explored. In the introductory sections of this volume we discussed the materiality of shoes. This discussion revealed different attitudes towards shoes or dress mediated by class, status, gender, life course and individual or group expression. Indeed, social science understands that our contemporary attitude towards gender, for example, is mediated by generation, personal experience, education, class and regional or

in Early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries