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Nataša Gregorič Bon

and the overall reciprocal exchange of ideas and care constitute, reaffirm and renew the relationship between migrants and the families left behind (Glick Schiller and Fouron 2001). This brings us to a more complex understanding of the meanings of citizenship and family relations. Baldassar (2007) argues that remittances and other transnational connections such as ‘staying in touch’ not only maintain communication between migrants and their relatives but also maintain emotional connections among them. In this way remittances and transnational care influence the

in Migrating borders and moving times
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Selling the Barefoot College
Stewart Allen

-based forms of mass communication, the spectacle has come to play an increasingly pervasive role in the shaping of public life. The spectacle of developmental change, I suggest, is an important part of modern-day development efforts, helping organisations to enrol supporters and influence policy through the demonstration of the efficacy and efficiency of development programmes to effect change on people and communities. Guy Debord has perhaps provided the most forceful analysis of spectacle to date through his critical analysis of the development of spectacle as a

in An ethnography of NGO practice in India
Alison Powell

individual to the collective. As the project matured, I built the DataWalking.org website to explain the process and open up exchanges with others experimenting with it. The data walkshop 223 Situating and reflecting on surveillance Some work in geography as well as communication studies assumes that urban mediation consists of what Flyverbom and Madsen call ‘data produced by objects’ (2016: 1) – the strata of data produced by sensors and cameras. As the emerging literature on data, space and value indicates, this data becomes integrated into organisational, calculative

in Ethnography for a data-saturated world
Stewart Allen

test circuits. Other skills, such as handling and use of tools like wire strippers and wire cutters, are learned in an informal manner in the course of the trainees’ development. With seven different nationalities speaking seven different languages, it was perhaps not wholly surprising that the foremost obstacle the trainers faced was communication. Of the thirty-four women that I trained with, eighteen were Circuits of knowledge 115 7  Solar training at the workshop described as illiterate, three as semi-literate and eleven as literate. The centre defined ‘semi

in An ethnography of NGO practice in India
Liene Ozoliņa

and discipline. Writing one’s own destiny I met Īrisa at a seminar on ‘Communication Skills’. She was taking careful notes throughout the 4 days in a neat notebook that said Kursi (‘Courses’) on the cover, written by hand. Īrisa later told me that she would take this notebook along to all the seminars and that afterwards she would share the ideas noted down with her peers at the senior women’s club she ran. Īrisa was in her early 60s. She had copper-colour hair, always beautifully coiffed, and she liked wearing brightcoloured, feminine blouses and delicate scarves

in Politics of waiting
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The witnessing of development success
Stewart Allen

gather ‘allies’ for the validation of certain scientific practices among specialists and non-specialists alike. While Boyle was restricted to particular communication technologies for validating experimental facts in the seventeenth century – namely, literary technologies in the form of scientific journals – the significance of witnessing may, it is argued, be extended to include other material means of persuasion. With the advent of the information age in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries and the potential ability to transfer and have instant access to

in An ethnography of NGO practice in India
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A new faction of the transnational field of statistics
Francisca Grommé, Evelyn Ruppert and Baki Cakici

‘Big Data technology’ such as NoSQL, Hadoop, Spark, etc.) and statistical skills (referring to traditional statistics knowledge, which test should be used for which problem, how to determine if a sample is representative, etc.). The competency category referred to broader skills, applicable for all civil service positions, defining a common core of skills and attitudes that civil servants are expected to possess. These included collaboration, personal improvement, meeting deadlines, leadership and communication (including the ability to explain technical issues to

in Ethnography for a data-saturated world
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Stewart Allen

-centred approach to solar power promoted by the College. Relationships and links were established with international NGOs, a process amplified and made easier through the then novel, yet growing, use of Internet-based communication networks. The College eventually became host to participants from partner NGOs, acting as a demonstration project itself in sustainable, community led development, providing training and know-how to individuals from Afghanistan, Costa Rica, Uruguay, Tanzania and Kenya, to name just a few. This informal, trial-and-error, understanding

in An ethnography of NGO practice in India
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Modelling, ethnography and the challenge of the anthropocene
Hannah Knox

’ and as such it is able to provide explanations for that which big data can only describe at a surface level (Wang 2013). Other responses to the relationship between big data and ethnography have focused less on what ethnography can add to big data analytics and more on what cultural analysis has to say about big data as a phenomenon. Boyd and Crawford’s (2012) now seminal paper in Information, Communication & Society outlines an approach to big data that highlights the social, cultural and technological dimensions of contemporary data analysis. In an attempt to cut

in Ethnography for a data-saturated world
Zaira Lofranco

monopolised wartime attention, while other anthropologists documented how shifting borders and border crossings had had unpredictable effects on inhabitants’ production of identity, affiliations and moral maps in ways that often unsettled identity markers like religion, ethnicity and nationality and their political connotations (Ballinger 2003; Pelkmans 2006). As Pelkmans (2006: 73) notes for neighbourhoods caught up in the reconfiguration of the Turkish–Soviet border, ‘discontent focused on more subtle differences that only became obvious in faceto-face communication

in Migrating borders and moving times