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Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Carmen Mangion

and deference that had previously been convent protocol. Communication skills needed to be relearned. Not all religious institutes experimented with silence in the 1960s and 1970s. One sister explained the discomfiting consequences in the mid-1970s of transgressing convent silence not by speaking, but by introducing sound: I can remember, in the holidays we had to scrub the school from top to bottom … And I switched the radio on, so I had the radio going as I was scrubbing some stone stairs. I mean it wasn’t anything sort of wild and sort of … you know, it

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Carmen Mangion

through the cacophony and violence of enemy action that resulted in the unwelcomed mitigation of the rules of enclosure. Disruptions were faced in Europe too, especially in countries that had been bombed or invaded. 47 International congregations with motherhouses in Europe sometimes faced obstacles to communication. Decision-making had devolved to local superiors of the Sisters of Charity of Our Lady, Mother of Mercy and a temporary novitiate had opened in Pantasaph during the war years because of irregular communication with their Dutch motherhouse. 48 Sister

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
David Geiringer

1972) pointed out that: The amount of laughter you have [when talking about sex], is evidence for, not against the seriousness of your communication. If you have this, the laughs never fail, because sex is funny. 21 Gentle humour

in The Pope and the pill
Carmen Mangion

experimental community of four sisters in England in 1968. The visitator praised this new style of living religious life: ‘This small community, the first of its kind in the Province, illustrates especially the way in wich [ sic ] a community can be integrated into the life of the parish.’ She commented on the genuine sharing of interests in small communities. 104 Such collegiality and camaraderie, though, was not guaranteed. After a visit to another community in 1987, visitators reported that after two years the community exhibited a lack of communication and uncertainty

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Cara Delay

that the result was a ‘cultural cataclysm’, in which patterns not only of behaviour but also of thought were transformed. Gone, she argues, were the ‘imagination, memory, creativity and communication’ of the vernacular system, and in their place came ‘linear and colonial thought-patterns’.68 These transformations were also gendered: Bourke, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, and others have interpreted the modern, literate world’s overtaking of ‘creative’ oral traditions as a victory of the masculine over the feminine, the triumph of the male-led ‘devotional revolution’ over the

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
Carmen Mangion

. Her work accentuated how autonomous Poor Clare monasteries were ‘bound closely together by genuine affection’ and connected via epistolary communication. Aschmann recounted letters read out loud from Poor Clare abbesses living abroad on the feast days of founders St Clare and St Francis. 29 A Right to be Merry from the start was directed to an international audience. First published by Sheed and Ward in the United States and England in 1956, it remains a popular work, republished in a new edition in 2001 by Ignatius Press. It was well reviewed in the English

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Stephen Penn

cannot communicate the capacity to create, either, as has been said. God’s divisible action, therefore, first makes him create a creature whose production he communicates to another creature: material forms are of such a kind. Indeed, God creates intelligence, soul and matter in his own image, but there are still degrees in these. And although God alone can do any of these things, nevertheless divisible material requires the communication of its parts, and the soul of a man predetermines the disposition of his offspring. And for this reason these things are not so

in John Wyclif
Abstract only
Cara Delay

. Gathering at the chapel provided women with opportunities for communication and socialising. In her memoir, Marrie Walsh recalled that her mother would ‘dally’ and gossip on her way home from mass in the early twentieth century.111 Róise Rua, who grew up in remote ­Donegal, was hired out as a domestic servant when she was a teenager. There, she and her sister, who worked nearby, continued to go to mass. ‘It goes without saying’, wrote Rua, ‘we were delighted to get a chance to talk to each other and chew over any news we might have heard from home.’112 Women also, by the

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
David Geiringer

how dominant constructions of infantilism and childhood intersected with personal Catholic religiosities. In this sense, it deals with early life more as a theme and social category than a lived life-cycle stage. For ease of communication, the deterministic association between religious belief and childhood that has been sketched here will be referred to as the ‘infantilism hypothesis’. It was, of

in The Pope and the pill