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Gothic Melodrama and the Aesthetic of Silence in Thomas Holcroft‘s A Tale of Mystery
Diego Saglia

Focusing on melodrama and on Thomas Holcroft‘s exemplary A Tale of Mystery (1802) in particular, this essay proposes a reinterpretation of Gothic drama and theatre as constitutively characterized by interruptions of comprehension. The tribulations of its persecuted protagonist Francisco are read in the context of the court trial of a real-life Francisco, who lived in London in 1802 and was one of the ‘stars’ in contemporary newspaper reports from the Old Bailey. Combining different generic and tonal modes, Romantic-period Gothic melodrama capitalized on explicitness and hyperbole, as well as on materializations of ethics and sentiment through their overt exhibition on stage or ‘ostension’. At the same time, it emphasized absence, silence, dematerialization and dissolution. With its continuously deferred revelations,and ostensions of the unsaid, A Tale of Mystery is a significant investment in an aesthetic of the unsaid that is central to a definition of Gothic on stage.

Gothic Studies
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Goth Subcultures in Cyberspace
Jason Whittaker

While Goths tend to be neglected in more mainstream media, they are thriving as part of online communities as part of the phenomenon of net.Goths. This paper considers some of the recent manifestations of such subcultural activities online, especially in relation to the practice of demarcating the boundaries of participation through displays of cultural capital (such as music and fashion), and aspects of communication that have emerged on the Internet such as ‘trolling’. The overarching concern of this paper is to explore some of the ways in which defining a subculture virtually may reinforce activities of the group in other environments.

Gothic Studies
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The Chronotope of the Ghost Ship in the Atlantic World
Julia Mix Barrington

Ghost ships haunt Atlantic literature, but surprisingly few scholars have focused on these striking Gothic figures with any depth. Responding to this oversight, this essay introduces the chronotope of the ghost ship to the literary conversation, tracing it through four key transatlantic texts: Richard Henry Dana, Jr‘s Two Years Before the Mast (1840), a tale of the Flying Dutchman found in Blackwoods Edinburgh Magazine (1821), The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798), and Melville‘s novella Benito Cereno (1855). Wherever they appear in literature, ghost ships voice Gothic horror on the Atlantic; the strange temporality of the frozen yet eternally journeying ghost ship engenders in these texts a compulsion for communication with the living world. These Gothic missives bring uncomfortable and unspeakable subjects – particularly the moral terror of slavery – into the consciousness of more mainstream readers. To understand the ghost ship is to understand the Gothic double of Gilroy‘s Atlantic world.

Gothic Studies
Transformations and animal selves in contemporary women’s poetry
Polly Atkin

work of environmentalists and particularly wolf biologists’ to reconfigure the wolf as ‘unfairly maligned in human culture’, showing it instead to be ‘loyal, family oriented, monogamous and affectionate’. 24 Many of Moore's poems celebrate this side of the wolf. ‘If We Could Speak Like Wolves’, for example, uses the mating behaviour of wolves to expose the ill-defined roles of human spouses. Wolf communication seems brutal – ‘then each day hurt you in a dozen / different ways, bite heart-shaped chunks / of flesh from

in In the company of wolves
Johan Höglund

When the moving image is invented and early film turned from the simple recording of everyday scenes to telling stories in the beginning of the twentieth century, these early films frequently turned to classic Gothic texts such as Frankenstein and Dracula . In this way, Gothic is multimodal and intermedial from its earliest beginnings and it invades virtually all new forms of artistic communication as these are invented. When computers and digital communication enabled what has been termed ‘new media’, Gothic moved with it, taking the form of hypertexts, or what

in Nordic Gothic
Wolf behaviour becoming wolfish nature
Marcus Sedgwick

. Scientific accounts are based on interests and concerns for understanding, among other things, predation and hunting behaviour; reproduction, family structures and pack size; use of territories; conflicts within and between packs; intra- and extra-pack communication; generally, the social ecology of wolves in particular places and what is going on with them and between them in their worlds. As good scientists, different wolf scientists will have different views and interpretations of all the elements that make up wolf worlds but what they are all constructing is Canis

in In the company of wolves
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Sofia Wijkmark

they'll be satisfied with that.’  30 Mikael discovers that Pessi can create images – for instance, he paints the wall of the apartment with the blood of one of Mikael's lovers – but he never really communicates with language or signs. However, at the end of the novel, some sort of communication takes place for the first time. Significantly, this is when the alpha-male meets them in the forest, and the message is clear: ‘It waves the gun barrel with a movement that's idiotically well known from the movies and yet

in Nordic Gothic
Young Adult literature and the metaphorical wolf
Kaja Franck

potential for incorporating both the wolf and the human equally in the figure of the werewolf. The word ‘conversation’ suggests that this is based on the concept of communication. However, ultimately, Cohen concludes that this equal engagement is undercut by the hierarchy of the human subject over the animal Other. The power and failings of human language in the experience of the teenage werewolf are central to Maggie Stiefvater's Wolves of Mercy Falls series (2009–11) and Annette Curtis Klause's Blood and Chocolate ( 1997 ). 24

in In the company of wolves
Frankenstein in new media
Tully Barnett and Ben Kooyman

‘hypertext blurs the boundaries between reader and writer’ (4) and argued that as ‘a fundamentally intertextual system, [it] has the capacity to emphasise intertextuality in a way that page-bound text in books cannot’ (35). Meanwhile, app-based storytelling – the medium to which Dave Morris’s app belongs – has been characterised as ‘a loose conglomeration of phenomena such as the Internet, digital television, interactive multimedia, virtual reality, mobile communication, and video games’ (Huhramo and Parikka 1). These new formats alter the

in Adapting Frankenstein
Lissette Lopez Szwydky

-Birthing the Monstrous: James Whale’s (Mis)Reading of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein .’ Critical Studies in Mass Communication 15 (1998): 382–404. ‘Playbill announcing a revival of Peake’s Presumption for December 7, 1830 at the Theatre Royal Covent Garden.’ Downloaded from ‘A collection of playbills from Covent Garden Theatre, 1829–1830.’ British Library. Nineteenth Century Collections Online (NCCO). Poovey, Mary. ‘My Hideous Progeny: Mary Shelley and the Feminization of Romanticism.’ PMLA 95.3 (1980): 332

in Adapting Frankenstein