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Abstract only
E.A. Jones

, hermits were humbler in origin and ambition. Most were involved in what we would think of as public works, especially in connection with the emerging world of mobility and communication, and often around the urban fringes: building roads, maintaining causeways, keeping bridges. In the first half of our period they seem to have enjoyed popular and official patronage and support, but things changed markedly after the Black Death

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

strict on this point, requiring silence on three days of every week in the year [ 19 ]; even for communication with their servants, anchorites should rely on sign-language [ 24 ]. Although their conversation might be limited, servants offered companionship. Ancrene Wisse also allows a cat, 13 and the visionary anchoress of Winchester has a young girl (presumably a maidservant) who keeps her company when she is

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

with chapels: the medieval London Bridge had a row of houses built on it, as well as its chapel dedicated to St Thomas Becket, and there are surviving bridge-chapels at several locations besides the chapel of St Mary, Derby, that is included here [ 42 ]. 6 The connection of hermits, as religious wanderers, with travel and communication seems to have been a strong one. As well as roads and bridges, hermits manned the ferry

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
Abstract only
Andrew Brown and Graeme Small

the scaling back of civic political rights’. Or, ritual was a ‘cheaper way’ than repression to curb urban unrest, its forms providing a means of mass communication for princes to tighten their grip on urban society. 93 However, studies since Pirenne have not ignored the extent to which rulers of the Low Countries were dependent on their towns, or to which the worlds of court and

in Court and civic society in the Burgundian Low Countries c.1420–1530
Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

– lines of communication [ 13 ]. While archaeology has revealed traces of earlier settlement on the site of ‘New Salisbury’, the grid-planned and partially fortified town laid out in the thirteenth century is a dramatic instance of ecclesiastical involvement in the urban expansion of the period. 6 By the time of the grant of the royal charter, it is evident from this text that much practical work had

in Towns in medieval England
Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

’s member of parliament, and hosting officers of the crown [ 58 ]. External relations, both with other cities and with the royal court, were a constant diplomatic concern [ 59 ], [ 60 ]. 9 While an individual town might carry relatively little weight in national politics, close and strategic communication between cities meant that on occasion an urban lobby could command sway in the royal council. 10 The perceived importance of the

in Towns in medieval England
I.S. Robinson

This chapter contains the text of Annals of Lampert, translated and annotated by I.S. Robinson.

in The Annals of Lampert of Hersfeld
Jonathan R. Lyon

:39. 31 This is an intriguing statement on communication within the community and has caught the attention of scholars: see Beach, Women as scribes , 70 and Lutter, Geschlecht & Wissen , 98. For monastic silence more generally, see Bruce, Silence and sign language in medieval monasticism . 32

in Noble Society
Abstract only
John H. Arnold and Peter Biller

delivered in the vernacular to a particular parish on a specific date. 2 See, in general, D.L. d’Avray, The Preaching of the Friars: Sermons Diffused from Paris before 1300 (Oxford, 1985); B.M. Kienzle, ed., The Sermon (Turhout, 2000); as ‘mass media’, D.L. d’Avray, Medieval Marriage Sermons: Mass Communication in a Culture Without Print (Oxford, 2001). For sermons and exempla against heresy in particular, see Sackville, Heresy , pp. 53–75; B.M. Kienzle, Cistercians, Heresy and

in Heresy and inquisition in France, 1200-1300
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In search of pre-Reformation English spirituality
R. N. Swanson

the one hand because of the inclusion of much that was apocryphal (although it was clearly not denied authority on those grounds: the rejection and dismissal now implicit in ‘apocryphal’ has to be overcome); on the other, because the function of such acts of communication was generally not to convey the simple ‘Biblical’ text but to provide guidance to doctrinal knowledge and interpretation, thus in

in Catholic England