Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 212 items for :

  • "communication" x
  • Manchester Religious Studies x
Clear All
Abstract only
Learning the languages of peace
Stanley Hauerwas

communication as the paradigm of ethics. I do so because McCabe’s stress on the bodily character of communication challenges the presumption that communication can take place without people actually being present to one another. 9780719082542_C02.qxd 8/9/11 15:52 Page 53 Pentecost: learning the languages of peace 53 Moreover by focusing on McCabe’s account of language I hope to show how, at least for Christians, the assumption we must choose between membership in a particularistic community or some version of a more inclusive humanism is a false alternative. For the

in Religion and rights
Palestine– Israel in British universities
Author: Ruth Sheldon

For over four decades, events in Palestine-Israel have provoked raging conflicts between members of British universities, giving rise to controversies around free speech, ‘extremism’, antisemitism and Islamophobia within higher education, which have been widely reported in the media and subject to repeated interventions by politicians. But why is this conflict so significant for student activists living at such a geographical distance from the region itself? And what role do emotive, polarised communications around Palestine-Israel play in the life of British academic institutions committed to the ideal of free expression?

This book invites students, academics and members of the public who feel concerned with this issue to explore the sources of these visceral encounters on campus. Drawing on original ethnographic research with conflicting groups of activists, it explores what is at stake for students who are drawn into struggles around Palestine-Israel within changing university spaces facing pressures associated with neoliberalism and the ‘War on Terror’. It begins from this case study to argue that, in an increasingly globalised world that is shaped by entangled histories of the Nazi Holocaust and colonial violence, members of universities must develop creative and ethical ways of approaching questions of justice.

Tragic Encounters and Ordinary Ethics curates an ethnographic imagination in response to the political tensions arising out of the continuing violence in Palestine-Israel. It invites students and academics to attend to lived experiences within our own university institutions in order to cultivate ethical forms of communication in response to conflicts of justice.

The claim of reason
Ruth Sheldon

public audience. While the participants in this event valorised practices of University melodramas 85 communicative rationality, explicitly highlighting the cool logic of their own arguments, the debate itself was a profoundly theatrical, affective and sensual experience.10 As theories of social performance have highlighted, the (re)production of normative cultural meanings relies on forms of aesthetic communication which create not only cognitive understanding but also a sensation of being compelled and moved among an audience (Alexander 2005a). As such, the

in Tragic encounters and ordinary ethics
Abstract only
Responses to clerical support for republicanism
Brian Heffernan

superiors and parish priests had agendas of their own that determined their responses. It was important to the bishops not to alienate the republican camp, but they also had to respond to the criticisms of scandalised conservatives, while ensuring that lines of communication with the government in Dublin Castle remained open. Moreover, they were concerned for the Irish church’s reputation abroad, especially in the Vatican. Religious superiors wanted to avoid internal conflict within their communities, and parish priests often simply wished to keep trouble away from their

in Freedom and the Fifth Commandment
Abstract only
Good relations, freespeech and political activism
Ruth Sheldon

Conclusion: good relations, free speech and political activism What did she learn in order to do that? What did she learn from having done it? If she had never made such leaps, she would never have walked into speech. Having made it, meadows of communication can grow for us. (Stanley Cavell 1999: 172, original italics) To encounter the Palestine–​Israel conflict in British universities is to be confronted with an unsettling, tragic situation. This is a site of contestation not only in relation to the substance of justice claims, but also with regard to how to

in Tragic encounters and ordinary ethics
Pamela Sue Anderson

world of the Enlightenment’.1 Second, this critique undermines Christianity’s relation to a ‘politics of rights’ that, according to Hauerwas, distorted twentieth-century theology with its focus on universal claims for individuals. Third, Hauerwas’s Christianity assumes that faith-community is destroyed by the autonomy of individuals that he finds in the secularising of liberal theology. But, in his terms, the ‘events’ of ‘Babel’ and ‘Pentecost’ reveal a theological remedy for the sin of autonomous individualism: the ‘bodily’ nature of ‘a community of communication’ is

in Religion and rights
Carmen Mangion

and deference that had previously been convent protocol. Communication skills needed to be relearned. Not all religious institutes experimented with silence in the 1960s and 1970s. One sister explained the discomfiting consequences in the mid-1970s of transgressing convent silence not by speaking, but by introducing sound: I can remember, in the holidays we had to scrub the school from top to bottom … And I switched the radio on, so I had the radio going as I was scrubbing some stone stairs. I mean it wasn’t anything sort of wild and sort of … you know, it

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Abstract only
Hanneke Canters and Grace M. Jantzen

power will need to give way to a logic of communication and mutuality Putting this another way, if, with Irigaray, it is possible to develop mutuality between sexually (or multiply) different subjects, then in so doing we will also have pointed the way to a revision of the logic which had kept the barriers in place. Feminist strategies of logic But how can we proceed? Even if logical systems have often been used as technologies of control, it remains the case that most people (including most logicians) do want to think clearly and do not want to be deceived. Nor

in Forever fluid
Abstract only
Unsettling subjects of justice and ethics
Ruth Sheldon

the start of this chapter, we saw scenes of political activism which diverged from the liberal vision of democratic public spheres as arenas of rational communication 4 Tragic encounters and ordinary ethics between objective actors. Students not only responded to events in Gaza with rational arguments, but also expressed passionate irreconcilable personal commitments over the stakes, form and scope of this politics. Students clashed over their dissonant experiences of their campuses during the occupations over ‘Operation Cast Lead’; some felt a swelling of

in Tragic encounters and ordinary ethics
Hanneke Canters and Grace M. Jantzen

develop engaged communication amongst ourselves; yet in her writings the voices of women are effectively silenced, and there is as little evidence that Irigaray is listening to them as there is that Freud or Lacan or Heidegger took women’s voices seriously. 127 Critical identities One could argue in mitigation that in order to create a space for a female subject within philosophy, Irigaray has to address what Braidotti calls the ‘masters of philosophy’ (1994a: 129). Nobody can do everything. Irigaray has done so much; it is churlish to complain that she has not done

in Forever fluid