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agenda. In line with globalisation, flexibility comes simultaneously to mean all things and yet nothing precise at all. The discourse on flexibility pervades the policy agenda of the competition state (Cerny, 1990; Porter, 1990), the restructuring strategies of firms (Ruigrok and van Tulder, 1995) and the everyday experiences of workers (Pollert, 1991; Beck, 2000b). The conception of globalisation as a process reinforces the assumption that the state is compelled to ‘retreat’ or adopt new policy instruments (Strange, 1996), the flexible firm in a ‘global web’ is the

in Globalisation contested
Open Access (free)
The restructuring of work and production in the international political economy

actions and activities of MNCs. Academic commentaries in IPE, economics, sociology and business studies have commonly singled out the MNC as the central site of production and work for the global economy and, therefore, as a leading agent of globalisation. As the primary vehicles for global forces, firms are represented as acting to intensify competition, reacting to technological imperatives and transmitting knowledge and practices of restructuring across national boundaries. Media commentaries variously depict the multinationals as ‘a powerful force for good’ (The

in Globalisation contested
Concepts and practice

competition and encouraging partnership between the State and private sectors. Additionally, the State encourages the involvement of the voluntary and private sector in services typically provided by the State such as green space, health with social care, and transport. This is commonly considered privatisation of state assets and services. Devolution occurs when the responsibility for decision-​making is regionalised; from national to lower governmental levels. Many argue that the neoliberal hegemony has exacerbated urban socio-​economic polarisation (Musterd and Ostendorf

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice
Open Access (free)

10 Maps as objects Tuur Driesser The PathoMap In September 2013, New York University (NYU) announced an award of  $250,000 to two teams of researchers as part of the presidential Grand Challenge competition dedicated to promoting ‘significant scientific research that has the potential to solve major national or global problems’ (New York University, 2013: no pagination). One of these teams, comprised of researchers from a number of the university’s research centres, including the Center for Genomics and Systems Biology and the Center for Urban Science and

in Time for mapping

historic European cities. The virtues of the European city are emphasised by its mix of uses, walkability, and focus on public transportation. Furthermore, with increased levels of competition, cities have sought to develop high-profile iconic buildings designed by star architects, such as the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao by Frank Gehry, or the Imperial War Museum in Manchester by Daniel Libeskind. The development of such buildings acts both as a feature of differentiation, in that through a unique design they stand out from their surroundings and help the city develop a

in Spacing Ireland
The restructuring of work in Germany

and sustained through state intervention (see Röpke, 1942; Eucken, 1949): Unlike this negative conception of the state typical of liberal theory in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, in the Ordo-liberal view, the market mechanism and the impact of competition can arise only if they are produced by the practice of government. The Ordo-liberals believe that the state and the market economy are not juxtaposed but that the one mutually presumes the existence of the other. (Lemke, 2001: 193) This conception of a state-market relation that reconciles social needs

in Globalisation contested
Open Access (free)
Unheard voices and invisible agency

-corporatist’, run in a seamless web of power with the practices of unprotected workers in the less developed countries (LDCs) of the ‘South’, and with the ‘invisible’ work undertaken in the informal sectors of Amoore_Global_07_Ch6 137 6/19/02, 1:49 PM Globalisation contested 138 the ‘North’. For a contract worker in a British production plant, the everyday practices of Mexican workers producing the same component for the client corporation may be far more proximate than geography would dictate, and may be expressed ambiguously in terms of competition and insecurity, or in

in Globalisation contested
Securing or denying minorities’ right to the city?

 al., 2016; Follman The post-​ 1970s political-​ economic shift from a welfare-​ driven to a more market-​ driven and market-​centric thinking and action, particularly in the United States and United Kingdom and later in other parts of the global North and South, has been described as neoliberal(ism) (see Brenner and Theodore, 2002). In this chapter, the term is used to underscore the competitive and entrepreneurial workings of the State and its unjust implications for the vulnerable population. Given the focus on competition, efficiency and profit-​making, neoliberalism

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice
Open Access (free)

6 Introduction T he mood is shifting in the contemporary globalisation debate. Only a few years ago, talk of the contested and politicised nature of globalisation would have met with scepticism from those who emphasise the sheer economic power of globalising forces. The orthodox popular and academic representations of globalisation have for several decades sustained the image of a powerful economic and technological bulldozer that effortlessly shovels up states and societies. The very discourse of the ‘competition state’ (Cerny, 1990) effectively sanitised

in Globalisation contested
Exploring the real-time smart city dashboard

rather than scenarios: affording diverging, iterative and open-ended play instead of singular, ­predefined, top-down planning narratives. 250 (In)formalising If we think of politics as participation, we observe a tension between competition and collaboration in smart city governance. Real-time is used as the equivalent of smart, individual or collective.11 Many smart apps frequently resort to competition. Klauser, Paasche and Söderström (2014), for instance, describe how an IBM Smarter Energy Executive believes that people can be encouraged to change their behaviour

in Time for mapping