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Wood reads Philip Sidney’s New Arcadia in the light of the ethos known as Philippism, after the followers of Philip Melanchthon the Protestant theologian. He employs a critical paradigm previously used to discuss Sidney’s Defence of Poesy and narrows the gap that critics have found between Sidney’s theory and literary practice. This book is a valuable resource for scholars and researchers in the fields of literary and religious studies.

Various strands of philosophical, political and theological thought are accommodated within the New Arcadia, which conforms to the kind of literature praised by Melanchthon for its examples of virtue. Employing the same philosophy, Sidney, in his letter to Queen Elizabeth and in his fiction, arrogates to himself the role of court counsellor. Robert Devereux also draws, Wood argues, on the optimistic and conciliatory philosophy signified by Sidney’s New Arcadia.

Sir Philip Sidney’s legacy of anti-factionalism
Richard James Wood

Although Philip Sidney’s Arcadia was completed in the previous decade, it was in fact a work of great literary significance to the 1590s. In particular, the literary quarrel associated with the different publications of the romance reflected the conflicting political philosophies of the publications’ editors. This was a dispute over Sidney’s literary heritage, with added importance for the possible future direction of a state dogged by factionalism. As one of Sidney’s early editors, Fulke Greville chose to connect the Arcadia with one particularly prominent

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
Mary A. Blackstone

 160 9 Henry V and the interrogative conscience as a space for the performative negotiation of confessional conflict Mary A. Blackstone Despite the relative distance in time between Shakespeare’s England and the upheavals of earlier Reformation and Counter-​Reformation periods, persistent aftershocks of anxiety surrounding religious belief and allegiance continued to destabilize the bedrock of English society from the level of the court and members of the nobility down to parish churches and their clergy and even to the level of Shakespeare’s groundlings

in Forms of faith
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Conflicted conflicts in Astrophil and Stella and the New Arcadia
Richard James Wood

[of Sidney and his like-minded party] may have been diminished by the fact that they were much more experienced in symbolic conflicts in the tiltyard than in real warfare’. 4 That is to say, Sidney’s symbolic conflicts, constructed in a context of frustrated enthusiasm for action, could neither satisfactorily express his religious and political ethos, nor adequately prepare him for the battle proper. I am also interested in exploring the differences between the two Arcadia s. However, in contrast to Norbrook, I wish to suggest that Sidney’s revisions, rather than

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
The Earl of Essex, Sir Philip Sidney and surviving Elizabeth’s court
Richard James Wood

. Sidney introduces the symbolic display and martial chivalry of the Elizabethan tiltyard into the conflicts represented in his fiction, and as mentioned in Chapter Five , it has been argued that the ‘military effectiveness [of Sidney and his like-minded party] may have been diminished by the fact that they were much more experienced in symbolic conflicts in the tiltyard than in real warfare’. 17 In another ill-fated military campaign (begun in 1591) in the wider conflict with Spain, to aid the Protestant King of France, Henri IV, in his besieging of Rouen, Essex

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
Sir Philip Sidney and stoical virtue
Richard James Wood

for Philoclea and his own self-defence. This echoes the internal conflict that hampered him when he unwillingly fought his friend Philoxenus. Amphialus is repeatedly faced with similarly thorny choices, and he repeatedly puts breath before shame, much as Pibrac did over the Saint Bartholomew’s Day Massacre. In doing so, he rejects the ‘selfless flight to the end of life’, which disqualifies him as a figure representing a strictly stoical doctrine. This might be seen, particularly from the perspective of Languet’s putative opponents, as marking Amphialus’s story as a

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
Abstract only
Richard James Wood

versatile as Philip Sidney. I would contend that writing in the genre of romance not only necessitates a greater degree of freedom from the constraints of any informing set of values than does writing a defence of poetry, but also provides a broader canvas on which to paint the numerous, complex, often conflicting aspects of the parochial as well as cosmopolitan operations of any such philosophy. 20 As such, I wish to emphasize the particularity of Sidney’s romance as an expression of his values rather than the particularity of his values per se. If one were to consider

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue