Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 126 items for :

  • Manchester Medieval Sources x
Clear All
Michael Staunton

immediate eruption of conflict upon Thomas’s elevation to Canterbury, Herbert’s version is also guilty of distortion. He passes over the danger to the relationship between archbishop and king caused by Thomas’s claiming of royal castles and his antagonising of the king’s tenants-in-chief. The description of the council of Tours is highly selective

in The lives of Thomas Becket
Abstract only
C. E. Beneš

the western Mediterranean brought it into military and economic conflict with the Muslim empires of north Africa and Spain, while its major contributions to the First Crusade (especially at Antioch, Jerusalem, and Caesarea) brought it great wealth and gave its merchants favoured status in the new crusader state. 31 The Genoese later played major roles in the Second, Third, Fifth, and Seventh Crusades as well. In

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

. Chapter two: Regarding Ugo, the second archbishop. Ugo, the second archbishop, took office in the year of the Lord 1163 and completed twenty-five years in the archiepiscopate. 36 He was first archdeacon and was afterward elected to the archbishopric. He was a man of great wisdom; when a certain conflict between the Avvocati and the di Castello ( de Castro ) caused many slayings, he led them back to peace by his

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

Genoa. Then, because at that time there was great discord and conflict between the Genoese and the Pisans, the aforesaid pope went to Corneto, where he ordered the Genoese and the Pisans to send him official ambassadors with full negotiating power. And when the ambassadors came to Corneto, the pope reconciled them one to another. 11 He also sent [a message] to Siro, the bishop of Genoa, summoning him into

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

between them so that he could escape them, and said in a loud voice that he believed in the resurrection, and that he had been arrested for this belief. When the Pharisees, who believed in the resurrection, heard this, they said that they did not wish Paul to suffer any harm. The Sadducees, on the other hand, said that he should die. A great dispute thus arose between them, and so Paul escaped from their clutches. This conflict was good because

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Abstract only
Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

considerable resistance, both within Corbie and outside. When the second book was added, however, Radbert was no longer abbot, and even though the conflicts that led to his ‘retirement’ are not entirely clear, he did not step down entirely of his own volition. 27 His own career now resembled that of his beloved Arsenius, who had been exiled from Corbie and Louis’ court. Although Radbert never attained Wala’s elevated social and political status, as abbot of Corbie he had been part of the leadership of the kingdom of Charles the Bald. Once this came to an end, fiction and

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire
C. E. Beneš

discord between me and you is your judges and lawyers. If you wish me to withdraw from your [city], give me six of the wisest judges and lawyers among you, whom I will choose; I will take them with me as hostages and leave you in peace’. When Demosthenes, that wisest of orators, had heard this he spoke to the people, saying, ‘There was great conflict for a long time between the wolves and the shepherds. Then the wolves said to the shepherds: “The

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

.5. 87 Probably Louis III ‘the Blind’, emperor 901–5; the long conflict that included his reign ended with the establishment of the Ottonian dynasty. 88 Transfer of empire ( translatio imperii ) is the influential medieval idea that the mantle of supreme earthly power passes

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
C. E. Beneš

produced any rain, because they have not done any powerful deeds. And thus it is well said of them that, like clouds and winds when the rain does not follow , so is the boasting man—that is , the arrogant man—who does not fulfill his promises . 66 [Due to Jacopo's own death early in 1298, this section ends with the conflict between the Genoese and Venetians unresolved, before the great

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Abstract only
Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

brothers, why it had fallen, and then simultaneously corrected, strengthened and stabilised these things so that henceforward it would remain united and stable. For the most prominent and highest-ranking men ought to have kept watch with great foresight and counsel to see to it that the commonwealth ( respublica ) and the stability of the entire empire would not collapse through discord once more and perish. For usually there is no other end to conflict between illustrious [and] powerful men than either universal destruction or else the victor’s total dominance, and

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire