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Wood reads Philip Sidney’s New Arcadia in the light of the ethos known as Philippism, after the followers of Philip Melanchthon the Protestant theologian. He employs a critical paradigm previously used to discuss Sidney’s Defence of Poesy and narrows the gap that critics have found between Sidney’s theory and literary practice. This book is a valuable resource for scholars and researchers in the fields of literary and religious studies.

Various strands of philosophical, political and theological thought are accommodated within the New Arcadia, which conforms to the kind of literature praised by Melanchthon for its examples of virtue. Employing the same philosophy, Sidney, in his letter to Queen Elizabeth and in his fiction, arrogates to himself the role of court counsellor. Robert Devereux also draws, Wood argues, on the optimistic and conciliatory philosophy signified by Sidney’s New Arcadia.

Sir Philip Sidney’s legacy of anti-factionalism
Richard James Wood

Although Philip Sidney’s Arcadia was completed in the previous decade, it was in fact a work of great literary significance to the 1590s. In particular, the literary quarrel associated with the different publications of the romance reflected the conflicting political philosophies of the publications’ editors. This was a dispute over Sidney’s literary heritage, with added importance for the possible future direction of a state dogged by factionalism. As one of Sidney’s early editors, Fulke Greville chose to connect the Arcadia with one particularly prominent

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
Conflicted conflicts in Astrophil and Stella and the New Arcadia
Richard James Wood

[of Sidney and his like-minded party] may have been diminished by the fact that they were much more experienced in symbolic conflicts in the tiltyard than in real warfare’. 4 That is to say, Sidney’s symbolic conflicts, constructed in a context of frustrated enthusiasm for action, could neither satisfactorily express his religious and political ethos, nor adequately prepare him for the battle proper. I am also interested in exploring the differences between the two Arcadia s. However, in contrast to Norbrook, I wish to suggest that Sidney’s revisions, rather than

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
The Earl of Essex, Sir Philip Sidney and surviving Elizabeth’s court
Richard James Wood

. Sidney introduces the symbolic display and martial chivalry of the Elizabethan tiltyard into the conflicts represented in his fiction, and as mentioned in Chapter Five , it has been argued that the ‘military effectiveness [of Sidney and his like-minded party] may have been diminished by the fact that they were much more experienced in symbolic conflicts in the tiltyard than in real warfare’. 17 In another ill-fated military campaign (begun in 1591) in the wider conflict with Spain, to aid the Protestant King of France, Henri IV, in his besieging of Rouen, Essex

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
Sir Philip Sidney and stoical virtue
Richard James Wood

for Philoclea and his own self-defence. This echoes the internal conflict that hampered him when he unwillingly fought his friend Philoxenus. Amphialus is repeatedly faced with similarly thorny choices, and he repeatedly puts breath before shame, much as Pibrac did over the Saint Bartholomew’s Day Massacre. In doing so, he rejects the ‘selfless flight to the end of life’, which disqualifies him as a figure representing a strictly stoical doctrine. This might be seen, particularly from the perspective of Languet’s putative opponents, as marking Amphialus’s story as a

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
Abstract only
Richard James Wood

versatile as Philip Sidney. I would contend that writing in the genre of romance not only necessitates a greater degree of freedom from the constraints of any informing set of values than does writing a defence of poetry, but also provides a broader canvas on which to paint the numerous, complex, often conflicting aspects of the parochial as well as cosmopolitan operations of any such philosophy. 20 As such, I wish to emphasize the particularity of Sidney’s romance as an expression of his values rather than the particularity of his values per se. If one were to consider

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
A Philippist reading of Sidney’s New Arcadia
Richard James Wood

a cultural order ravaged by confessional conflict’. Stillman’s extensive biographical research reveals Duplessis-Mornay’s faith to be ‘uncompromising in its militant opposition to Tridentine Catholicism…but…simultaneously moderate by virtue of its ecumenically inclusive appeal to all Christians for assent’ ( Philip Sidney and the Poetics of Renaissance Cosmopolitanism , pp. 125, 127–33). Stillman draws on Hugues Daussy’s landmark study Les Huguenots et le Roi: Le combat politique de Philippe Duplessis-Mornay, 1572–1600 (Geneva: Droz, 2002). 16 Robert

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
Sir Philip Sidney, the Arcadia and his step-dame, Elizabeth
Richard James Wood

unkindness towards their charges, the former going as far as to justify any disobedience this may provoke in the children. 31 As Vanhoutte recognizes, ‘transferred analogically to the political realm’, such attitudes would amount to the justification of rebellion. At the very least, the ‘possibility of contingency and transformation’ in the governance of the state was put in play. 32 Indeed, Elizabeth highlighted the political application of such domestic conflict herself when, in 1569, she advised the French ambassador that ‘she had taken great pains to be more than a

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
Sir Philip Sidney, humility and revising the Arcadia
Richard James Wood

might have been ‘called on to produce poetry for a wedding: the wedding [the match between Elizabeth and Anjou] which, he believed, would be a prelude to the destruction of England’s religion and liberty’. For Worden, Sidney’s ‘A Letter to Queen Elizabeth, Touching her Marriage with Monsieur’ and Philisides’s song are the author’s own ‘mean way’ of negotiating a similar conflict of occasion and conviction, not by singing a ‘song he had learned’, but ‘by taking up his pen’. 5 Philisides’s role in the New Arcadia , as a knight in Queen Andromana’s tournament, is a

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
Jean R. Brink

of Harvey's conflicts with his Cambridge colleagues is important to Spenser's biography because it makes us aware of Harvey as a figure in his own right and introduces us to his somewhat quirky personality. Convinced of his own intellectual superiority, Harvey was treated as a social inferior by many at the university. In the correspondence preserved in his private Letter-Book , he reveals character traits that are more publicly displayed

in The early Spenser, 1554–80