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James D. Fry
,
Bryane Michael
, and
Natasha Pushkarna

important principle in its own right. Much of the authority vested in international derives from agreements and events determined outside of the founding constitution, but what about the authority derived from their founding constitutions? 3 Such authority may come from subsequent treaties and agreements clarifying, expanding or restricting the international organization’s authority to decide and act on certain issues. 4 Many have tried to measure the way such authority in international changes

in The values of international organizations
Abstract only
James D. Fry
,
Bryane Michael
, and
Natasha Pushkarna

To date, the prevailing view of international has been that they provide a formal channel of interstate cooperation. Since the mid-nineteenth century, international have focused mostly on particular regions or specialized purposes. At the same time, they enshrine several common principles and values, although not as many as the leading textbooks on international law would have us believe. This book has put these principles and values to the test. Using a database of the founding constitutions of

in The values of international organizations
James D. Fry
,
Bryane Michael
, and
Natasha Pushkarna

actions, as evidenced by the 2011 Articles on the Responsibility of International (ARIO). Such rules would thus make them responsible for doing an act to someone for something. 10 What are these indefinable somethings? These “somethings” represent these ’ principles and values. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD) constitution provides an obvious example. 11 The nine recitals found at the beginning of the OECD’s constitution present the principles guiding the

in The values of international organizations
James D. Fry
,
Bryane Michael
, and
Natasha Pushkarna

Introduction What do the numbers describing each international organization’s constitution tell us about these ’ principles? The Caribbean Telecommunication Union’s constitution may mention equality more than any other constitution, literally twice as often as the Indian Ocean Rim Association’s and the Organisation for Islamic Cooperation’s. How do these numbers compare with those of their peers? Do the high-frequency mentions of efficiency in the constitutions of the Association of Caribbean

in The values of international organizations

This book quantifies international organizations’ affiliation with particular values in their constitutions, like cooperation, peace and equality. The statistical and legal analyses tease out from the data the actual values contained in international organizations’ constitutions and their relationship with one another. Values like cooperation, representation and communication often appear together in international organizations’ constitutions. However, divide these organizations into groups – like regional versus universal organizations – and a kaleidoscope of different patterns in these values emerges. In the kaleidoscope, the reader clearly can see distinct groupings of organizations and values. With data pointing the way, many new – and seemingly contradictory – interpretations of international organizations law emerge. Not only does this book provide a map of international organizations’ values, it provides a healthy start towards fully understanding that map, thereby helping global governance take a quantum leap forward.

Transformative constitutionalism and fair and equitable treatment
René Urueña
and
María Angélica Prada-Uribe

towards vulnerable populations. The Colombian Constitutional Court has been recognized as a champion of transformative constitutionalism in the region, and many of its decisions have been, in fact, groundbreaking in terms of the protection of human rights and the environment. The 1991 Colombian Constitution grants the Constitutional Court a broad authority in terms of the

in Latin America and international investment law
Members, dissidents, and an outsider
Magdalena Bas

against international investor–state arbitration, a position based on its identification with the Calvo doctrine, and which generated an obvious differentiation from the rest of the states or groups of states across the globe. The aforementioned doctrine, elaborated in 1868 by the Argentine jurist Carlos Calvo and later incorporated into several South American constitutions, was

in Latin America and international investment law
A Latin American dialectic
Farouk El-Hosseny
,
Patrick Devine
, and
Ilan Brun-Vargas

( VCLT ); 25 or (ii) domestic law, if the relevant norm is enshrined in municipal law. 26 Their contents may not necessarily overlap. For example, while there is still debate as to whether a right to water has crystallized under international law, a number of states have unequivocally recognized that right in domestic legislation, including in their constitutions. 27 The novelty

in Latin America and international investment law
A quest for balance
Rodrigo Polanco Lazo
and
Felipe Ferreira Catalán

national legal instruments (the constitution, law, decrees, regulations, jurisprudence etc.) in accordance with the [American Convention of Human Rights], with the Inter-American corpus juris more generally (also called the ‘block of conventionality’).” 17 This started to shift traditional State’s perceptions about the Inter-American Court as a

in Latin America and international investment law
Claims to universality and charges of particularism
Philip Burton

recognizes in favor to foreigners, any other obligations or responsibilities than those which in favor of the natives are established in like cases by the constitution and the laws. 85 The Recommendation was only endorsed by six of the eighteen states. The United States

in Latin America and international investment law