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Abstract only
Hugh Morrison

. Reconstituting the missionary family Thus, the concept of the missionary family and household is now well-documented, and its nuances are much better understood. However, to date, little has been written about the demographic shape and constitution of missionary families. Statistics are often episodic or embedded in other scholarly narratives, for example, the nine children of the Crooks family in 1820s Tahiti

in Protestant missionary children’s lives, c.1870–1950
Life as ordinary
Hugh Morrison

sense through processes of contextualisation or introspection. 119 Thus oral history, as a form of ‘autobiographical narration’ of childhood, is significant for its role in the longer-term ‘constitution of biographical meaning’. 120 First, one interview casts light on memory construction through a mixture of feelings, the interview process and hindsight. Kirsten’s interview exemplified the extent to

in Protestant missionary children’s lives, c.1870–1950
Abstract only
Missionary children inhabiting imperial and colonial spaces
Hugh Morrison

travel and access were normative. Another approach is to think about Pomfret’s contention that ‘the spaces in between “departure” and “arrival”’ were important for the constitution of ‘new subjectivities’ and of ‘a transnational perspective’ among young people, irrespective of race. 46 Yet another is to think about how missionary children mediated ‘empire’ through their

in Protestant missionary children’s lives, c.1870–1950
Harrison Akins

British Cabinet was sensitive to the position of the princely states within an independent India and argued that the government would need to plan for ‘the fulfilment of the obligations of the Crown toward the States (which will remain unimpaired except in so far as they may have voluntarily transferred powers to the new Indian Union).’ Cabinet members also argued that the princely states’ representatives should be on an equal footing with representatives from British India in any constitution-making body and hold the freedom to

in Conquering the maharajas
Abstract only
‘The Switzerland of the East’
Harrison Akins

services that had traditionally been a Pandit reserve. They urged the Maharaja to delay the introduction of representative government and other planned reforms until the British Indian government framed a federal constitution, which was currently being discussing at the Round Table Conferences in London. Once a new federal structure was implemented in India, it would be known whether protection of minorities would be the responsibility of New Delhi or the ruling princes. 14 Nevertheless, the Maharaja introduced some reforms in line

in Conquering the maharajas
Territorial disputes, unequal citizens and the rise of majoritarian nationalism in India, Pakistan and Bangladesh
Amit Ranjan

formed 80 per cent of the province of Baluchistan. 21 Initially, Kalat and Pakistan had signed a standstill agreement, but a few months after signing the agreement the Khan of Kalat, Mir Ahmed Yar Khan, declared the independence of Kalat and promulgated a constitution. Yar Khan considered the possibilities of joining India, Afghanistan, Iran, or even asking the United Kingdom for protectorate status. After exploring its options, Yar Khan decided to join Pakistan in March 1948, although he did not consult his council or

in The breakup of India and Palestine
Arie M. Dubnov

the world's biggest democracy, with a constitution that does not discriminate between people based on faith or ethnicity, one cannot avoid noticing the rise of an exclusionary Hindu nationalist sentiment and a weakening of its democratic institutions. ‘If we look at what one might call the hardware of democracy’, as Indian historian Ramachandra Guha put it more than a decade ago, Indians are entitled to self-congratulation, but ‘if one examines the software of democracy, the picture is less cheering’. 13 During the

in The breakup of India and Palestine
Wm. Matthew Kennedy

I cannot too emphatically declare that for me the re-constitution of England involves the re-constitution of the whole British Empire, and the admission of the colonies as integral and co-governing members of it. The legal principle that Englishmen carry the laws of England to every new country seems to me, rightly understood, to involve the integrity and homogenousness of the whole Empire, equality of rights and duties amongst all its subjects; not the creation of any number of little separate

in The imperial Commonwealth
Amnesty International in Australia
Jon Piccini

, founded in 1951, with venerable communist, biochemist and nationally recognised folk dancer, Shirley Andrews, at the helm. 17 The council’s founding constitution put its aims simply: ‘to help the aborigines to win for themselves the liberties envisaged for all people in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights’. This reference responded to a brief wartime rights Zeitgeist, with the constitution’s convoluted wording capturing

in Humanitarianism, empire and transnationalism, 1760–1995
Institutions, policies, laws and people
Victor Kattan
and
Amit Ranjan

governments of the envisaged Arab and Jewish states to enshrine human rights safeguards in their constitutions and to outlaw the expropriation of private property. 67 In her chapter on the 1947 UN Partition Plan for Palestine, Laura Robson stresses the importance of international institutions in trying to resolve national conflicts and the differing visions of the state-making capacities that emerged at the UN, with most European states favouring an

in The breakup of India and Palestine