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Mark Doidge, Radosław Kossakowski and Svenja Mintert

conversation throughout the week, not just on a matchday (Nowell-Smith, 1979: Stone, 2007). Conversations will take place in pubs, bars, at work and on social media. All of this maintains the intensity of interaction that can be sustained until the next match. The ultras style of fandom can intensify this passion as members of the group will discuss, plan and produce the key parts of the performance: choreographies, chants and banners. Regular interaction helps engender a sense of belonging to a wider community. In his analysis of the Aboriginal corroberee rituals, Durkheim

in Ultras
Mark Doidge, Radosław Kossakowski and Svenja Mintert

the year. The quality of the tifo can be quantified in the number of views for each video. Rivalry and competition thus intensify away from the match. Football fandom has long been enacted away from the match, from watching on television to conversations in bars and at work. This has DOIDGE__9780719027624_Print.indd 96 08/01/2020 10:19 Social media 97 only intensified with social media. Within this basic linguistic framework, the rituals of football can be played out online, ensuring the emotional attachment to football club and friends continues long after the

in Ultras
Christian Suhr

is fine,’ Aziz replies. ‘Christian is doing a research project and film about healing and Islam. About how Muslims understand healing and illness.’ I explain my project to Aziz. I am interested in understanding how people can be attacked by magic, the evil eye, or become possessed by jinn, and how it is possible to cure these forms of illnesses. Aziz immediately takes over the conversation: ‘They give me these pills, they say I have to take pills, but the pills do not help anything. I

in Descending with angels
Abstract only
Liene Ozoliņa

, and then brought the conversation back to the recent tragedy and shared with me a story of one of the survivors she had been counselling: Here, I’ll give you one great example, I haven’t told it [to anyone] yet but I plan to remember it for my work with the unemployed and elsewhere that I work. A very vivid example. It has to do with Maxima, with the ones that passed away. A vivid example. And there will be a conclusion that I draw. So, the roof collapses in Maxima and there are little stores nearby [within the same shopping centre]. And a sales assistant is

in Politics of waiting
Liene Ozoliņa

. After seeing her at a few of the seminars, I approached her and explained my research. We started meeting regularly over the course of my fieldwork in one or another little café in the centre of Riga to chat about her experiences at the unemployment office and her attempts to look for a new job. Over a number of conversations, Īrisa also told me more about her life. She had once worked on Soviet trading ships as a crew member and had seen foreign lands and eaten foreign delicacies that most other Soviet citizens could only dream of. After getting married and having

in Politics of waiting
Open Access (free)
Tracing relatedness and diversity in the Albanian–Montenegrin borderland
Jelena Tošić

is not surprising that the genealogies and conversations I recorded described migrations across the old border to the Ottoman territory – as in the case of the Vukičević – and uses them to legitimise the transformation of ethnic and religious identity in the region up to the present day. ‘This was Turkey, you know’, my interlocutors kept on repeating, highlighting that conversion cannot undo kinship relations. Marko Karadaglić explained his view of the conversion of the Paljević as follows: ‘They accepted this new religion, but they remained our relatives. Their

in Migrating borders and moving times
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Modelling, ethnography and the challenge of the anthropocene
Hannah Knox

practice of modelling unstructured data – or what I call here the challenge of ‘baseless data’ – and how this might reframe conversations about the relationship between ethnography and data science. The chapter unpacks how the modelling of found empirical data in the context of climate science begins with the issue of how to create a baseline. I then reflect on the way in which this relationship between data and baseline reaches its limits in the analysis of social phenomena, opening up a space for ethnography to enter in. Dwelling in this problem of the limit of

in Ethnography for a data-saturated world
Kathryn Cassidy

trading of cigarettes and other products to Romania was often present in village life; in conversations over the fence with neighbours, in performances for St Andrew’s feast day at the village school and during drinks and birthday celebrations in the village sauna. The significance of cross-border small trade in the village was not limited to its role in sustaining and reproducing local households,2 but lay also in the way in which Diyalivtsyany3 infused discourses surrounding the trade with meaning and its influence on their changing perspectives of the past

in Migrating borders and moving times
Christian Suhr

[testified to the truth of God], then you let them go.’ Some months after this conversation, I was contacted by one of Feisal's friends. He told me the shaykh in their mosque had suddenly refused to continue with the exorcisms. In contrast to his previous claims about Feisal being possessed by a rather alarming number of jinn, the shaykh now held the opinion that Feisal was suffering from a psychological disorder. Feisal's friend was not convinced by the shaykh. On behalf of Feisal he contacted me and asked if I could establish a contact with Abu

in Descending with angels
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Commute
Mona Abaza

opens with a scene that says it all. The plot starts with the birthday of a one-year-old infant taking place in the public communal garden of a compound, with a large number of neighbours wishing the child happy birthday and socialising with various parents. In the open space of the compound we see clowns dressed à la Walt Disney moving around, loud Western music, decorations, fashionable children’s outdoor inflatable bouncers, games, and balloons. English words are constantly mixed with Arabic dialect in conversations, such as ‘Oh my God’, ‘negative energy’, ‘she is

in Cairo collages