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The American Gothic and the Miasmatic Imagination
Emily Waples

This article argues that American medicine‘s preoccupation with atmospheric etiology shaped the American Gothic as it was instantiated by Charles Brockden Brown and developed by Edgar Allan Poe. Antebellum medical discourse, I suggest, worked in service of a paranoiac hypervigilance or what I call the \miasmatic imagination\. Read in conversation with Gothic fiction, miasma theory offers a way of conceptualizing "atmosphere" as both etiological and rhetorical: a medium for the transmission of disease and a literary technique for the transmission of meaning.

Gothic Studies
The Return of the Hibernian Repressed During the Rise and Fall of the Celtic Tiger
Stephen Carleton

Whilst debate rages in certain circles as to what constitutes an Irish Gothic tradition and whether imposing canonical status upon it is even possible or desirable, very little of this discussion focuses on twenty-first century writing, and certainly not upon writing for the stage. The aims of this essay are twofold: to argue the case for a contemporary Irish Gothic theatre school (whose primary proponents I will identify as Martin McDonagh, Conor McPherson, Marina Carr and Mark ORowe); and to place this contemporary school in conversation with the Irish Gothic literary corpus identified by the scholarship of Terry Eagleton, Seamus Deane, W. J. McCormack, Jarlath Killeen, Christopher Morash, Richard Haslam, Sinéad Mooney and David Punter. The resulting intention here is to open up a fresh way of reading and comparing contemporary Irish playwrights,that allows us to place their work into sharper focus when it comes to comparing them to each other as pre-eminent Irish writers of the millennial period.

Gothic Studies
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The Chronotope of the Ghost Ship in the Atlantic World
Julia Mix Barrington

Ghost ships haunt Atlantic literature, but surprisingly few scholars have focused on these striking Gothic figures with any depth. Responding to this oversight, this essay introduces the chronotope of the ghost ship to the literary conversation, tracing it through four key transatlantic texts: Richard Henry Dana, Jr‘s Two Years Before the Mast (1840), a tale of the Flying Dutchman found in Blackwoods Edinburgh Magazine (1821), The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798), and Melville‘s novella Benito Cereno (1855). Wherever they appear in literature, ghost ships voice Gothic horror on the Atlantic; the strange temporality of the frozen yet eternally journeying ghost ship engenders in these texts a compulsion for communication with the living world. These Gothic missives bring uncomfortable and unspeakable subjects – particularly the moral terror of slavery – into the consciousness of more mainstream readers. To understand the ghost ship is to understand the Gothic double of Gilroy‘s Atlantic world.

Gothic Studies
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Hawthorne, Ligotti, and the Absent Center of the Nation-State
Donald L. Anderson

Although composed before 9/11, Nathaniel Hawthorne‘s My Kinsman, Major Molineux and Thomas Ligotti‘s The Shadow at the Bottom of the World are both prescient in their critique of the impulse of American communities following 9/11 to monumentalise and concretise the nation-state and in particular the remains at Ground Zero. In this essay I discuss Ground Zero as a suggestive trope for the illusiveness of the nation as an imagined community. These complementary Gothic short stories operate as allegory and offer a way of reading how patriotic communities cohered around what remained at Ground Zero and (re)produced it as a site of patriotic performance. A new Gothic trait in our age of terror(ism) is the anxiety over the absence of a stable centre that anchors national continuity. This article places these short stories in conversation with Benedict Anderson,,Étienne Balibar and other theorists who engage critiques of nation-building in order to draw out what is Gothic about the nation-state and to further substantiate how 9/11 revealed the nation-state as a principally Gothic phenomenon.

Gothic Studies
Responsibility and obedience in I, Robot and X-Men: First Class
Matt Lorenz

. Similarly, Lanning senses that the Three Laws will be insufficient to protect humanity from V.I.K.I., and he creates further offspring whose suspicions of and departures from robotic principles will enable them to countermand V.I.K.I.’s machinations. After Spooner, Sonny, and Calvin (who is arguably Lanning’s fourth creation) have stopped V.I.K.I., they have a final conversation in which Sonny confesses to assisting Lanning’s suicide – a conclusion that Spooner had come to on his own – and the three of them stand together, each of them beneficiaries of Lanning’s parental

in Adapting Frankenstein
Editor: Eleanor Dobson

This book considers ancient Egypt and its relics as depicted in literature across the Victorian era, addressing themes such as reanimated mummies and ancient Egyptian mythology, as well as contemporary consumer culture across a range of literary modes, from literary realism to Gothic fiction, from burlesque satire to historical novels, and from popular culture to the elite productions of the aesthetes and decadents. In doing so, it is the first multi-authored study to scrutinise ancient Egypt in nineteenth-century literature, bringing together a variety of literary methodologies to probe ancient Egypt’s complex connotations across this era. This collection scrutinises and illuminates the ways in which ancient Egypt was harnessed to question notions of race, imperialism, religion, gender, sexuality and the fluidity of literary genre. Collectively, the chapters demonstrate the pervasiveness of contemporary interest in ancient Egypt through the consideration of narratives and authors held as canonical in the nineteenth century, bringing these into conversation with new sources brought to light by the authors of these chapters. Discussing the works of major figures in nineteenth-century culture including Edgar Allan Poe, Charles Baudelaire, George Eliot, H. Rider Haggard, Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde, this collection extends beyond British writing, to European and American literature. It weaves discussions of understudied figures – such as Charles Wells, Louisa Stuart Costello and Guy Boothby – into this analysis. Overall, it establishes the richness of a literary culture developing across the century often held to have ‘birthed’ the discipline of Egyptology, the scholarly means by which we might comprehend ancient Egyptian culture.

Victorian reclamations of a biblical temptress
Angie Blumberg

vague about dates, we can assume the conversations, which occurred at Kelmscott Manor, took place after 1871, when Rossetti and Morris began renting Kelmscott Manor, and before 1876, when the new edition was finally published. The remembered conversations indicate the extent to which Joseph and his Brethren inspired debate about sexually aggressive and complex female characters in Rossetti's circle, while also spurring reflections on experimental form and genre. Surrounded by the tapestry of the biblical story of Samson in Rossetti's studio

in Victorian literary culture and ancient Egypt
Young Adult literature and the metaphorical wolf
Kaja Franck

. 22 However, using an animal to explore the creation of human identity during puberty is informed by an assumption of human superiority rather than equality. Though referring to the depiction of lycanthropy in medieval literature, Jeffrey J. Cohen describes the werewolf as ‘not an identity-robbing degradation of the human, nor the yielding to a submerged and interior animality, but the staging of a conversation in which the human always triumphs’. 23 His description suggests there is the

in In the company of wolves
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Eleanor Dobson

, academic scrutiny of how ancient Egypt has been reimagined in the modern world has, only in the past couple of decades, begun to flourish. It is these relatively new and exciting critical conversations that this volume seeks to advance. While scholars (including those who have contributed to this book) – as I go on to outline – have recognised the rich seam of literature inspired by ancient Egypt that runs throughout the nineteenth century, these chapters take as their focus a broad range of primary objects of study, from novels and magazine serials

in Victorian literary culture and ancient Egypt
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The Frankenstein Complex: when the text is more than a text
Dennis R. Cutchins and Dennis R. Perry

through which another text is experienced (6). We would add that artists, as well as audiences, also operate within these textual layers or palimpsests, at least some of which they have chosen. This idea is reiterated in a number of the chapters that follow. Since intertextual adaptation studies teach us that a text’s meaning derives from its relationship to other texts, the more of these texts that become part of the conversation, the more meanings can accumulate. For example, in light of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein , Danny Boyle’s National Theatre production of

in Adapting Frankenstein