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The restructuring of work in Germany
Louise Amoore

4 Producing flexi-corporatism: the restructuring of work in Germany We support a market economy, not a market society … Modern social democrats want to transform the safety net of entitlements into a springboard to personal responsibility… Part-time work and low-paid work are better than no work… (Tony Blair and Gerhard Schröder, 1999: 1–7) T he positioning of German state-society within the globalisation and restructuring debates is, in itself, highly contested between competing voices and claims. In a neo-liberal reading, evident across international

in Globalisation contested
Open Access (free)
An international political economy of work
Author: Louise Amoore

Bringing fresh insights to the contemporary globalization debate, this text reveals the social and political contests that give ‘global’ its meaning, by examining the contested nature of globalization as it is expressed in the restructuring of work. The book rejects conventional explanations of globalization as a process that automatically leads to transformations in working lives, or as a project that is strategically designed to bring about lean and flexible forms of production, and advances an understanding of the social practices that constitute global change. Through case studies that span from the labour flexibility debates in Britain and Germany to the strategies and tactics of corporations and workers, it examines how globalization is interpreted and experienced in everyday life and argues that contestation has become a central feature of the practices that enable or confound global restructuring.

Open Access (free)
An international political economy of work
Louise Amoore

6/19/02, 1:55 PM Globalisation contested 160 distinctive meanings ascribed to national ‘models’ within the construction of globalisation are rarely problematised. Indeed, there is an assumption that the pressures of globalisation have heralded an undisputed victory for AngloSaxon neo-liberalism, and a defeat for social market corporatism. As I have shown, however, the making of a ‘global Britain’ has served a particular set of functions in the framing of the need to ‘harness’ globalisation via labour flexibilisation. Such representations extend beyond the terms

in Globalisation contested
Open Access (free)
Unheard voices and invisible agency
Louise Amoore

flexibilisation. In essence, programmes of hyperflexibility in Anglo-Saxon state-societies are concerned with expanding the ranks of the ‘outsiders’, making these involuntarily contingent workers the key group, and giving employers open access to this pool of labour. Flexi-corporatism, by contrast, reinforces the status of the ‘insider’ workers, using them to define and legitimate restructuring, and containing the outsiders by denying them access to the restructuring debate. Insider working practices Insider workers predominantly take on one of two central roles in the

in Globalisation contested