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Editor’s Introduction
Juliano Fiori

, provided particularly American inspiration for the post-war development of liberal global governance. 1 But the principles of great-power trusteeship and balancing, reflected in the Dumbarton Oaks proposals in 1944, were decisive in the creation of the United Nations. 2 Despite the early proliferation of liberal institutions under the aegis of the UN, Cold War prerogatives undermined cosmopolitan aspirations for world government. Cancelling each other out in the Security Council, the US and the Soviet Union prioritised bilateral negotiations. UN

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
An Interview with Caroline Abu Sa’Da, General Director of SOS MEDITERRANEE Suisse
Juliano Fiori

citizen movements that have been at the forefront of the emergency response. Similarly inspired by cosmopolitan ideals, these groups tend to use more political language than conventional NGOs, presenting their relief activities as a form of direct resistance to nationalist politics and xenophobia. As liberal humanitarianism is challenged in its European heartland, they are developing – through practice – a new model of humanitarian engagement. SOS MEDITERRANEE is an ad hoc citizen initiative founded in 2015 to prevent the death of people crossing the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
José Luís Fiori

, with their cosmopolitan project of liberal order and rules-based global governance, initiated after the Second World War and expanded after the Cold War. If this victory is consolidated, it will bring an end to the American messianism of the twentieth century, with its division of the world between ‘good’ and ‘evil’, its globalising imperative to reorganise the world through the deregulation of markets and frontiers and its conceited attempts to universalise liberal democracy and human rights. And it will also pose an existential threat to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

interests are not paramount ( Wissinger, 2017 ). These questions are also highly pertinent in the humanitarian, where the risks are greater and the power of users (as consumers and citizens) much less. It has been noted that the literature on datafied self-care focuses overwhelmingly on wealthy, educated, cosmopolitan citizens and themes relevant to their everyday lives and perceptions of citizenship. Thus, the distinction commonly drawn between ‘data rich’ governments

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

of the cosmopolitan ethos, the constructivist efforts to give the lie to Huntington’s allegation that ‘international elites’ are ‘dead souls’ because they lack a nationalist connection and have forgotten ‘the mystic chords of memory’ ( Huntington, 2004 ). 3 Humans need some sense of spirit, belief, meaning , a vision of the future. To do anything at all we must believe it is going to make a difference. Humanitarianism is one response to Max Weber’s claim that the iron cage of rationality would rob moderns of their enchantment ( Hopgood

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Kader Asmal

anniversary that spring, was much commended by Professor Asmal, who then focused his address on issues of identity, cosmopolitan multiculturalism, democracy, the reconceptualisation of the nation-state, development and the ways in which potentially divisive and destructive forces might be transformed into powers for the public good. No doubt influenced, in part, by rising food and fuel prices in the MUP_Hume_Peacemaking.indd 183 11/10/2013 15:25 184 Kader Asmal global south at that time and his contact with citizens on the front line of human survival as Minister for

in Peacemaking in the twenty-first century
Challenges and opportunities

This book explores the evolving African security paradigm in light of the multitude of diverse threats facing the continent and the international community today and in the decades ahead. It challenges current thinking and traditional security constructs as woefully inadequate to meet the real security concerns and needs of African governments in a globalized world. The continent has becoming increasingly integrated into an international security architecture, whereby Africans are just as vulnerable to threats emanating from outside the continent as they are from home-grown ones. Thus, Africa and what happens there, matters more than ever. Through an in-depth examination and analysis of the continent’s most pressing traditional and non-traditional security challenges—from failing states and identity and resource conflict to terrorism, health, and the environment—it provides a solid intellectual foundation, as well as practical examples of the complexities of the modern African security environment. Not only does it assess current progress at the local, regional, and international level in meeting these challenges, it also explores new strategies and tools for more effectively engaging Africans and the global community through the human security approach.

Abstract only
Naomi Head

, paradoxically, illustrate the limitations of many considerations of the use of force in IR. Habermas was in favour of the intervention in Kosovo, and he articulated his views most clearly in an article published in Die Zeit in April 1999, later translated and published in English. Although the article is written in the context of contemporary German politics, Habermas’s cosmopolitan world perspective is

in Justifying violence
Dialogue as normative grounds and object of critique
Naomi Head

turn, requiring that the principle of universalization (U) cannot be answered satisfactorily by a single individual, but must take place within an intersubjective dialogue. 28 This shift from a mono- logical to a dialogical exercise is fundamental in order to continue to justify any notion of the normative cosmopolitan project in the face of challenges to it posed by

in Justifying violence
Leonie Murray

-first century looks to the complex nature of contemporary conflicts and the global nature of the forces exerted on them; to root causes, sub and supra state structures and multi-level challenges. The global nature of the twenty-first-century peace challenge requires a cosmopolitan-multicultural, universal-globalist response that focuses on accepting diversity and transcends conflict and division through progress on common goals and recognition of common humanity. This chapter will address the normative challenge of twenty-firstcentury peacemaking, define the terms used herein

in Peacemaking in the twenty-first century