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On the relation between law, politics, and other social systems in modern societies
Darrow Schecter

reckon that the outlines of this culture can be imagined and spontan­eously cultivated as public sphere vigilance, activism in civil society, hospitality, friendship, and cosmopolitanism.44 92 Critical theory and sociological theory It would perhaps be tempting to contrast the defence of the expressly liberal version of FD and the role of law within it, on the one hand, with both the celebration of the dangers of politics and evident glorification of the state in Schmitt, as well as the strident anti-​liberalism of several prominent high profile university figures

in Critical theory and sociological theory
David Miller

autonomy and flourishing of their religious community, with any wider version of collective self-government. Any benefits that come to them from inhabiting a democracy are purely instrumental. Do they therefore fail to qualify as “citizen stakeholders” and might they be excluded from voting rights under ACS? Or for a different example, consider those members of the cosmopolitan elite who are rich enough that swapping jurisdictions would at most be

in Democratic inclusion
Open Access (free)
What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?
Catherine Baker

history might be? 3 Gilroy both calls for a ‘transcultural, international’, non-nation-state-centric mode of black social, intellectual and cultural history inside and outside Europe (Gilroy 1993 : 4) and emphasises that racialised hierarchies of belonging, the legacies of colonialism and slavery, are still circulating the globe in what many Americans and Europeans were then imagining as the supposedly cosmopolitan, multicultural and post-racial present (Gilroy 2004 ); moreover, his anti-essentialism towards race and racism harmonises with the deconstruction of

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Abstract only
Democratic state, capitalist society, or dysfunctional differentiation?
Darrow Schecter

is well founded in some respects, the theory accomplishes three important tasks: (1) it foregrounds FD as the bedrock of sociological facticity and the indispensable condition for an immanent critique of the relation between facts and norms; (2) it implicitly challenges a number of anthropological premises informing much theorising about communicative action, constitutional patriotism, cosmopolitan democracy, constituent power, recognition, and performance; and (3)  it indicates how inter-​systemic communication could actually be deepened and broadened to develop

in Critical theory and sociological theory
David Owen

establishment despite the moral costs this involved. This may have had claim to be reasonable response in Machiavelli’s period but would not suffice today since, for example, a republic established on the basis of ethnic genocide could potentially meet this standard. Rather the question for us would be whether the cosmopolitan community of humanity would have reason, all things considered, not to regret the establishment of such a basic structure despite the moral costs involved. This does not amount to a full account of vindication but it will suffice for current purposes

in Toleration, power and the right to justification
Abstract only
Darrow Schecter

populism or related threats to democratic legitimacy. It might thus seem to follow that what is really required now is a new kind of post-​modern cosmopolitanism rather than the renewal of critical theory as such.2 Yet the ongoing economic crises that have intensified since 2008 as well as the difficulties encountered by the Syriza government in Greece in 2015 indicate that the problems now facing democracies around the world run deep. It seems difficult to avoid the conclusion that cosmopol­ itanism may be necessary, but certainly not sufficient to preserve and enrich

in Critical theory and sociological theory
Open Access (free)
A pluralist theory of citizenship
Rainer Bauböck

subdividing them into three distinct sets of questions: justice within political communities (domestic), justice between political communities (inter-polity) and justice across political communities (trans-polity and global). 8 Of course, theorists of global justice and cosmopolitan democracy generally do not imagine a single undifferentiated polity encompassing all human beings. What they intend to challenge is not so much the

in Democratic inclusion
Open Access (free)
An epilogue
Saurabh Dube

images were an acute expression of what Partha Mitter has described as “the dark landscape of the psyche.” Finally, away from Bengal, painting in North India, Amrita Sher-Gill’s primitivist art, at once formatively modernist and startlingly cosmopolitan – drawing comparisons with her Mexican contemporary, Frida Kahlo – far exceeded merely “indigenous” influences. 9 It intimated instead a politics of art

in Subjects of modernity
David Owen

this has practical implications. In contrast to Bauböck's account, all non-resident citizens have a claim to be included in constitutional referendums and all long-term resident non-citizens have a claim to be enfranchised in national elections. References Angeli , Oliviero 2015 . Cosmopolitanism, Self-determination and Territory . Basingstoke : Palgrave

in Democratic inclusion
Catherine Baker

-level ethnicised homogeneity in the 1990s (Kalapoš 2002 ; Bellamy 2003 ), imagined Istria as historically ‘hybrid’ – allowing Homi Bhabha's work on identity and hybridity (see Bhabha 1994 ) to be translated into theories of south-east European ethnicity – and cosmopolitan. Yet both narratives, the anthropologist Pamela Ballinger ( 2004 ) argued, still depended on essentialised ideas of ethnicity–modernity–territory. While Trieste's own identity myth still concealed earlier Venetian, irredentist and Fascist perceptions of Slavs as less modern, the myth of ‘successful … ethnic

in Race and the Yugoslav region