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Richard James Wood

-centric’, ‘presentist’, or have paid too little attention to ‘Sidney’s consciousness of the public domain’. Stillman’s approach sees the Defence as ‘a cosmopolitan text informed by the values of a distinct, international body of Reformed humanists (the Philippists)’. Furthermore, in Stillman’s analysis, the unearthing of this previously unknown historical context for Sidney’s work ‘recover[s] for the past some portion of the particularity that gives it meaning’; Sidney, ‘[a]lways conscious that the circulation of texts carries public consequence’, defends poetry in an effort to

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
A Philippist reading of Sidney’s New Arcadia
Richard James Wood

, in Philip Sidney and the Poetics of Renaissance Cosmopolitanism , Sidney has suffered inside a critical context within which Reformed theology has been mistakenly identified as dogma proceeding from the writings of a single person, John Calvin. In particular, while the anthropology of Sidney’s poetics is arguably specific to Reformed Christianity, the assumption that its pious principles are thereby determined by Calvin’s theology fundamentally mistakes the diversity of a Reformed tradition that discovered models for its religious thought among a vast range

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
Sir Philip Sidney and stoical virtue
Richard James Wood

Melanchthon himself criticized the adherents of Stoicism, complaining that ‘the Stoics wanted to eradicate all emotions, good and bad alike; whereas the good ones, such as fear of God, trust and love for one’s wife and children, were actually required by divine law’ (Kraye, ‘Moral Philosophy’, p. 369). 18 See Stillman, ‘Deadly Stinging Adders’ and Philip Sidney and the Poetics of Renaissance Cosmopolitanism . 19 Stillman, ‘Deadly Stinging Adders’, pp. 245, 257. 20 Stillman, ‘Deadly Stinging Adders’, pp. 247–8; Sidney, The Defence of Poesy , pp. 101–2; the

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
Conflicted conflicts in Astrophil and Stella and the New Arcadia
Richard James Wood

Quarterly 12.1 (November 1948), pp. 23–55. 30 Stillman, Philip Sidney and the Poetics of Renaissance Cosmopolitanism , p. 200. Stillman’s reading of the section of Melanchthon’s Loci communes of 1555 on ‘Worldly Authority’ suggests that Melanchthon’s commonplaces ‘underscore the logic of that shared intellectualism of the resistance theorists’ ( Philip Sidney and the Poetics of Renaissance Cosmopolitanism , pp. 203–4); Melanchthon on Christian Doctrine: Loci communes, 1555 , pp. 323–43. 31 A Defence of Liberty against Tyrants: a translation of the Vindiciae

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
Sir Philip Sidney, the Arcadia and his step-dame, Elizabeth
Richard James Wood

, nature’s child’, the latter in flight from the former’s blows, realize their political consequence. 77 In his book, Philip Sidney and the Poetics of Renaissance Cosmopolitanism , Robert E. Stillman notes that Sidney’s letter ‘could never have been mistaken for … Stubbs’s-argument-discretely-published’: Sidney’s ‘unpublished “private” letter (designed for public circulation at court and among friends) does speak clearly about his finesse in accommodating political rhetoric to the demands of his political world’. Moreover, Sidney’s letter retained its popularity

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
Sir Philip Sidney’s legacy of anti-factionalism
Richard James Wood

and Their Narrative Function in Sidney’s Arcadia ’, Skretkowicz also attributes the appearance of Amphialus’s attire during combat to ‘his steadfast love for Philoclea’, but differs from my reading when assigning allegorical and narrative purposes to the knights’ devices (see pp. 283–6). 42 Stillman, Philip Sidney and the Poetics of Renaissance Cosmopolitanism , p. 176. See also Kuin, ‘Sir Philip Sidney’s Model of the Statesman’, for a discussion of the parallels between the careers of Sidney and Duplessis-Mornay. 43 Stillman, Philip Sidney and the Poetics of

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
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Figures of comparison and repetition in Spenser’s Cantos of Mutabilitie and Donne’s Anniversaries
Yulia Ryzhik

translatio . 61 After the publication of the first three books of The Faerie Queene , a more sceptical Spenser emerges in the 1591 Complaints and then, in 1596, when the next three books of his increasingly melancholic romance appear. Geographically and stylistically removed from London’s cosmopolitan, witty literary culture, Spenser is fascinated by ‘ruines’ and decline, topics which are always comparative, if not superlative. For what is ‘wourse’ (V.Proem.1) is so in light of something better; the worst exists only compared to things thought best. While such

in Spenser and Donne
The Earl of Essex, Sir Philip Sidney and surviving Elizabeth’s court
Richard James Wood

Shakespeare: Local Reading and Its Discontents (Berkeley, Los Angeles and London: University of California Press, 1988), pp. 67–83. Vanhoutte highlights Stubbs’s use of the rhetorical tropes of nationalism and motherhood, and Marcus places Stubbs’s subversive use of Elizabeth’s own ‘male’ rhetoric in a broader context of contemporary representations of the dominant woman, including Joan of Arc in Shakespeare’s 1 Henry VI . 49 Stillman, Philip Sidney and the Poetics of Renaissance Cosmopolitanism , pp. 24–6. 50 Woudhuysen, ‘Sidney, Sir Philip (1554–1586)’. 51

in Sidney's Arcadia and the conflicts of virtue
Erith Jaffe-Berg

to allow foreigners to reside in the state. In the case of early modern Venice, segregation and cosmopolitanism went hand in hand: ‘Questo significa però comprendere anche il cosmopolitismo che a questo vicenda [segregazione] è strettamente legato’ (Calabi 2016 ; This means also understanding that cosmopolitanism is closely linked to

in Transnational connections in early modern theatre
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Robert Henke

stereotyping as well as nuancing the Germans and the English. Migration, hybridity, and cosmopolitanism are the overwhelming facts of the early modern Amsterdam explored by Nigel Smith in this volume, but we shouldn’t romanticise this. Gerbrand Adriaenszoon Bredero (1585–1618), the Dutch playwright explored by Smith in Chapter 5, paradoxically defends vernacular linguistic purity

in Transnational connections in early modern theatre