Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 23 items for :

  • "critical realism" x
  • Film, Media and Music x
  • All content x
Clear All
Ian Aitken

became an important political objective for film-makers on the left, and many of the most important films made over this period draw directly upon the realist and naturalist tradition. Realist cinema, 1930–8 So far, the link between nineteenth-century critical realism/naturalism and twentieth-century French film-making has been followed from Zola to Antoine, then to pictorialist

in Realist film theory and cinema
Abstract only
Jonathan Bignell

Introduction As earlier chapters have shown, critical response to the canon of British television drama from the 1960s to the present focuses on oppositions between critical realism and aesthetic modernism. Critics’ responses to Beckett’s work reflected the changing emphases of this critical debate over naturalistic political drama versus avant-garde form. The movement of British television drama from the 1960s to today has been away from theatricality and Modernist experiment with the medium, in favour of

in Beckett on screen
Lukácsian cinematic realism in Danton (1990) and Senso (1954)
Ian Aitken

resides in the fact that it was made at a time when, following the death of Stalin and consequent liberalisation, Marxist film theorists and film-makers were turning again from a dogmatic socialist realism, to the models of critical realism elaborated by Lukács. Like Danton , Senso can be considered Lukácsian in the way that it attempts to portray a historical conjuncture through the prism of individual

in Realist film theory and cinema
Ian Aitken

years’. 3 The conviction that Lukács’ model of critical realism is both organically and inflexibly wedded to the nineteenth-century realist tradition, and incompatible with modernism, has led many to dismiss his thought and contribution, either in part or in whole. However, and as this chapter will attempt to show, an analysis of the core premises which underlie Lukács’ theoretical model throws this conviction into some

in Realist film theory and cinema
Ian Aitken

this period in the limelight was once more to prove epigrammatic, and, after 1934, Lukács’ influence was sharply curtailed when his then symbiotic theory of critical realism, the literary expression of the political views expressed in the Blum Theses , was displaced by the dogmatic doctrine of socialist realism advocated by Maxim Gorky, Alexandrovitch Zhdanov and others

in Lukácsian film theory and cinema
Abstract only
Modes of reading in Marxist-socialist and post-Marxist-socialist Television drama criticism
Geraldine Harris

aesthetics and political progressiveness in television drama. For instance, as a Marxist-socialist Trevor Griffiths was often called on to defend the use of television naturalism within his screenplays. He did so on the grounds of accessibility to a popular audience but also asserted that rather than naturalism, which he defined as un-self-reflexive, he actually employed a type of ‘critical realism’, which he placed firmly within a Marxist-socialist literary tradition (see Griffiths, 1986 and Poole and Wyver, 1984). As this suggests, the definition of realism and

in Beyond representation
The origins, characteristics and theoretical foundation of the nineteenth-century French realist, and naturalist tradition
Ian Aitken

both the painting and literature of the 1830s and across the political spectrum, realism emerged as a movement which attempted to represent the shortcomings of the new haut bourgeois hegemony. 21 Far from being the ‘art-form of bourgeois capitalism’, therefore, it could be argued that this form of realism developed as an expression of critical anti-bourgeois sentiment. In the field of literature, for example, a significant form of critical realism

in Realist film theory and cinema
Abstract only
Ian Aitken

2 follows this tradition into the twentieth century, and explores the influence of the naturalist tradition on early French cinema, covering the pictorialist naturalist school of the 1920s, the cycles of Zola adaptations which appeared between 1902 and 1938 and the ‘social realist’ cinema of Renoir. The chapter concludes by returning to the model of critical realism elaborated in Chapter 1 , and by accounting for Renoir

in Realist film theory and cinema
Abstract only
Ian Aitken

flowering of important naturalistic art forms, such as, for example, the documentary film, there was no broad-spectrum theoretical return to the nineteenth-century naturalist canon, as exemplified by the ideas and writings of Emile Zola. However, Lukács’ disparagement of most forms of modernism was quite another matter, and brought his theory of critical realism into considerable

in Lukácsian film theory and cinema
Abstract only
Jonathan Bignell

critical realism and aesthetic modernism. Critics’ responses to Beckett’s work in the 1970s, for example, reflected the critical debate of the time over the politics of naturalistic versus avant-garde form. British television drama from the 1960s onwards has moved away from theatricality and Modernist experimentation towards elaborations of cinematic naturalism. This latter form was seen as relevant, contemporary and politically progressive. Beckett’s television plays are situated within a complex dialectic of critical discourses around the aesthetics and politics of

in Beckett on screen