Search results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for :

  • "critical realism" x
  • Manchester Political Studies x
  • All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Anastasia Marinopoulou

  9 3 1 5 Critical realism SCIENCE, that is, knowledge of consequences; which is called also PHILOSOPHY. Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan1 Without contraries is no progression. William Blake, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell2 Introduction Critical realism: the painted veil of dialectics3 Critical realism attempted to ground dialectics in realism. Roy Bhaskar dealt extensively with the issue, and challenged Kant’s critique of science, empiricism and positivism throughout his work. He insisted on presenting the epistemological validity of structures or mechanisms which

in Critical theory and epistemology
The politics of modern thought and science

Epistemology should be the axe that breaks the ice of a traditionalism that covers and obstructs scientific enlightenment. This book explores the arguments between critical theory and epistemology in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Focusing on the first and second generations of critical theorists and Luhmann's systems theory, it examines how each approaches epistemology. The book offers a critique of the Kantian base of critical theory's epistemology in conjunction with the latter's endeavour to define political potential through the social function of science. The concept of dialectics is explored as the negation of the irrational and, furthermore, as the open field of epistemological conflict between rationality and irrationality. The book traces the course of arguments that begin with Dilthey's philosophy of a rigorous science, develop with Husserl's phenomenology, Simmel's and Weber's interest in the scientific element within the social concerns of scientific advance. In structuralism, the fear of dialogue prevails. The book discusses the epistemological thought of Pierre Bourdieu and Gilles Deleuze in terms of their persistence in constructing an epistemological understanding of social practice free from the burdens of dialectics, reason and rationality. It also enquires into issues of normativity and modernity within a comparative perspective on modernism, postmodernism and critical theory. Whether in relation to communication deriving from the threefold schema of utterance- information- understanding or in relation to self- reflexivity, systems theory fails to define the bearer or the actor of the previous structural processes. Critical realism attempted to ground dialectics in realism.

Abstract only
Anastasia Marinopoulou

  7 6 1 Conclusions T his book has aimed to examine dialectics in modern epistemology and to compare it with critical theory, not ‘in order to’ but ‘because’ the latter can offer innovative means of dialectical theorizing. In this way, critical theory has the potential to advance twenty-​first-​century epistemology. The prevailing idea in critical realism, as elaborated in the final chapter, was that dialectics can provide the best path to innovation in the science. The book attempted to avoid old and traditional modes such as ‘biographies’ of scientific terms

in Critical theory and epistemology
Abstract only
Anastasia Marinopoulou

articulated by phenomenology, structuralism, poststructuralism, modernists and postmodernists, systems theory and critical realism, can certainly be considered ‘modern’ in historical terms, but in essence their concerns are of a pre-​ modern and pre-​scientific nature. The following chapters elucidate this critique. Critical theory situated science within the quest for social and political rationality. It indicated that science’s normativity –​which answers the question ‘what should science do?’ –​orients itself in relation to the a priori potential of society. The latter

in Critical theory and epistemology
Abstract only
Contestation, care and the ‘temper of the country’
Gideon Calder

coming up with constructive visions for the common good. Combined, they amount to a suitably critical realism. I have tried to show that in making a serious fist of achieving a good society there is no avoiding penetrating, critical consideration of questions of value. There are, intriguingly, some who talk as if finding out facts will somehow sort these questions out for themselves. Of course, empirical work in that vein is absolutely vital to progressive causes. But it will never do the whole job, or even most of it. Carys Afoko makes a point reinforced by the recent

in Making social democrats
Abstract only
Robin Wilson

. There is, moreover, an epistemological critique here, informed by ‘critical realism’ (Benton and Craib, 2001; Sayer, 2000), which recognises that science is a social activity but that real objects are independent of it. Critical realism distinguishes the real world from interpretive schemata and scripts utilised by social actors to comprehend it. As Brubaker (2004: 81) argues, ‘race, ethnicity and

in The Northern Ireland experience of conflict and agreement
Abstract only
Anastasia Marinopoulou

critical realism. Such a discussion remains for the next chapter to analyse and criticize. Notes 1 Niklas Luhmann, Introduction to Systems Theory (Cambridge:  Polity Press, 2013), 254. 2 ‘There are no sufficient indications for the exhaustion of what is possible, for rationalization. We live, as we know since the earthquake in Lisbon, not in the best possible world, but in a world full of better possibilities.’ Author’s translation from Jürgen Habermas and Niklas Luhmann, Theorie der Gesellschaft oder Sozialtechnologie –​ Was leistet die Systemforschung? (Frankfurt

in Critical theory and epistemology
Heikki Patomäki

the basics of the critical realist alternative, see Heikki Patomäki, ‘How to Tell Better Stories About World Politics’, European Journal of International Relations , vol. 2, no. 1 (1996); and Heikki Patomäki and Colin Wight, ‘After Post-Positivism: The Promise of Critical Realism’, International Studies Quarterly , vol. 44, no. 2 (June 2000

in Mapping European security after Kosovo