Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 82 items for :

  • "demonology" x
  • Refine by access: All content x
Clear All
Abstract only
Languages of colonial conflict after 1900

Stirring language and appeals to collective action were integral to the battles fought to defend empires and to destroy them. These wars of words used rhetoric to make their case. This book explores the arguments fought over empire in a wide variety of geographic, political, social and cultural contexts. Essays range from imperialism in the early 1900s, to the rhetorical battles surrounding European decolonization in the late twentieth century. Rhetoric is one of the weapons of war. Conquest was humiliating for Afrikaners but they regained a degree of sovereignty, with the granting of responsible government to the new colonies in 1907 and independence with the Act of Union of 1910. Liberal rhetoric on the Transvaal Crisis was thus neither an isolated debate nor simply the projection of existing political concerns onto an episode of imperial emergency. President Franklin D. Roosevelt's principles of intervention in response to crimes against civilization, constituted a second corollary to the Monroe Doctrine. The rhetorical use of anti-imperial demonology was useful in building support for New Deal legislation. The book argues that rhetoric set out to portray the events at Mers el-Kebir within a culturally motivated framework, drawing on socially accepted 'truths' such as historic greatness and broad themes of hope. Now, over 175 years of monarchical presence in New Zealand the loyalty may be in question, devotion scoffed, the sycophantic language more demure and colloquialized, the medium of expression revolutionized and deformalized, but still the rhetoric of the realm remains in New Zealand.

Contemporary witchcraft and the Lancashire witches
Joanne Pearson

publication: see G. L. Burr, ‘A review of M. A. Murray’s Witch Cult in Western Europe ’, American Historical Review 27 (1921–2), pp. 780–3; C. L’Estrange Ewen, Some Witchcraft Criticisms: A Plea for the Blue Pencil (London: printed for the author, 1938); R. H. Robbins, Encyclopedia of Witchcraft and Demonology (London: Peter Nevill, 1959), pp. 116–17; E. E. Rose, A Razor for a Goat: Witchcraft and Diabolism (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1962). 7 Nancy Ramsey, ‘The myth of historical narrative in M. Murray’s The God of the Witches

in The Lancashire witches
Open Access (free)
Demonological descriptions of male witches
Lara Apps
and
Andrew Gow

reputation that demonological texts have as documents of barbarity, superstition, and irrationality. H.R. Trevor-Roper, for example, said of them that To read these encyclopedias of witchcraft is a horrible experience. Each seems to outdo the last in cruelty and absurdity. Together they insist that every grotesque detail of demonology is true, that

in Male witches in early modern Europe
The idioms and risks of defiance in the trial of Margaretha Horn, 1652
Alison Rowlands

patriachal elite’, whose statements and confessions were simply forced rehashings of that elite’s demonology.1 On the contrary – and despite the fact that power over the trial process lay ultimately with the council – alleged witches were capable of contributing to and of shaping the course of interrogations in idiosyncratic ways. At the same time, however, the trial of Margaretha shows that it was becoming increasingly problematic for women accused of witchcraft in early modern Rothenburg to articulate defiance against their accusers and the council without this defiance

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany

Christian dualism originated in the reign of Constans II (641-68). It was a popular religion, which shared with orthodoxy an acceptance of scriptual authority and apostolic tradition and held a sacramental doctrine of salvation, but understood all these in a radically different way to the Orthodox Church. One of the differences was the strong part demonology played in the belief system. This text traces, through original sources, the origins of dualist Christianity throughout the Byzantine Empire, focusing on the Paulician movement in Armenia and Bogomilism in Bulgaria. It presents not only the theological texts, but puts the movements into their social and political context.

Abstract only
P.G. Maxwell-Stuart

This section presents Part I of The Malleus Maleficarum, one of the best-known treatises dealing with the problem of what to do with witches, written in 1487 by a Dominican inquisitor, Heinrich Institoris. Part I is addressed to fellow theologians, and is devoted to showing that the conspiratorial pact between workers of harmful magic and evil spirits is no fantasy but a present reality, and that the cause of the increasing numbers of witches lies in the sexual relations between women and evil spirits. It is thus an extended essay in demonology rather than a handbook.

in The Malleus Maleficarum
James I’s Daemonologie and The Wonderfull Discoverie of Witches
Stephen Pumfrey

. James’s demonology, literally the science of demons, reproduced the ‘continental’ discourse of witchcraft as the ultimate, satanic heresy. Some historians have assumed that the accession to the throne of a monarch with a paranoiac fear of attack by witches, readily displayed in the book which Wallace Notestein said ‘offered a textbook to officials’, altered English legal attitudes and made an event like the Lancaster witch trials inevitable. They have accused James of personally initiating credulous witch-hunting in England. Some have reproduced the (understandable

in The Lancashire witches
Open Access (free)
The gendering of witchcraft
Lara Apps
and
Andrew Gow

. tales of erotic debauches, infanticide and cannibalism were revived and applied to various religious outgroups in medieval Christendom. In the process they were integrated more and more firmly into the corpus of Christian demonology. … the powers of darkness loomed larger and larger in these tales, until they came to occupy the very centre of the stage. Erotic debauches

in Male witches in early modern Europe
An historical essay concerning witchcraft (1718)
Andrew Sneddon

the Wenham trial, doing everything in his power to persuade the jury to bring in an innocent verdict. Powell even stated, after a witness had accused Wenham of flying, that ‘there is no law against flying’.39 Hutchinson took Sloane’s advice and decided against publishing his book at that time.40 II In Thinking with demons, Stuart Clark points out that the majority of sceptical texts could not damage the coherence of traditional witchcraft beliefs because mainstream sceptical and demonological theorists alike wrote within the confines of traditional demonology

in Witchcraft and Whigs
Open Access (free)
A male strategy
Soili-Maria Olli

, p. 63. See also Ülo Valk, ‘On the Connections between Estonian Folk Religion and Christian Demonology’, Mitteilungen für Anthropologie und Religionsgeschichte 8 (1994) 197. 31 Per Sörlin, Trolldoms- och Vidskepelseprocesserna i Göta hovrätt 1635–1754 (Umeå, 1993), p. 30. 32 RA Stockholm, Justitierevisionens Arkiv, JR, Utslagshandlingar, 31 October 1694, Bunt III, nr. 334. 33 RA Stockholm, Justitierevisionens Arkiv, JR, Utslagshandlingar, 1 December 1756, nr. 3. 34 RA Stockholm, Justitierevisionens Arkiv, JR, Utslagshandlingar, 22 December 1776, nr. 49. 35 See also

in Beyond the witch trials