Search results

somehow more respectable than immediate gratification (Miller, 2013). Miller describes everyday shopping as containing two values  –​ that of being thrifty (‘saving’ money), and that of expressing devotional love to significant others (spending). In doing so he adopts a dichotomous perspective of shopping as either provisioning or hedonic. Provisioning shopping is ‘everyday’, conducted out of necessity, and according to a utilitarian normative model in which individual desires are suppressed (2013). Whereas with hedonic shopping, goals are concerned with the

in A brief history of thrift
Abstract only
Puritans, Quakers and Methodists

gained their name due to their desire to ‘purify’ the Church of England from all Roman Catholic elements; they advocated greater purity of worship and doctrine, alongside personal and collective piety. This meant moral purity must be pursued to the smallest detail  –​man existed for the glory of God and above all else must do God’s will, including in the economic realm. Not surprisingly, this pursuing of purity led to an extreme asceticism, and a reputation for eradicating any form of pleasure. This reputation was not without evidence as once they had legislative power

in A brief history of thrift
Abstract only
Keynes, consumer rights and the new thrifty consumers

not conceive of the individual as an economic unit required to spend for the survival of the nation. It was the economic necessity for consumption –​the duty to spend –​that marked the true beginning of consumer society as we now know it. That said, it was not a ‘duty’ that was promoted as in any way dull of course. Rather, it was re-​branded as a ‘freedom’. The consumer as a desiring subject was born, and the idea that one might differentiate oneself from others via the purchase of specific products. Marketing, as an industry, emerged in order to ‘inform’ the

in A brief history of thrift
Benjamin Franklin, Samuel Smiles and Victorian moralism

. Blankenhorn et  al. praise Franklin for the way in which he both reflected the American mentality and shaped it into what we now call the ‘American Dream’, arguing that he ‘revealed dispositions that reflected not just his own character but the American character itself:  the passion for freedom, the aspiration for self-​improvement, the pragmatic approach to problems, the desire to do good, and the confident outlook on the future’ (Blankenhorn et al., 2009:5). They reject the claim that Franklin promoted an outmoded, crabbed and narrowly economistic vision of human purpose

in A brief history of thrift
Abstract only
Simplicity, sensuality and politics in Henry Thoreau

about thriving as much as it is about frugality, or to put it more accurately, frugality is a means to thriving in the present, rather than being financially sound in the future (as in Smiles or Franklin’s version). As Nachane argues, ‘Gandhi’s views may seem somewhat similar to the Protestant ethics of thrift but with this crucial difference that with the latter thrift was a means of capital accumulation for higher consumption levels in the future, whereas for Gandhiji frugality was a permanent desired state, not simply a postponement of present for higher

in A brief history of thrift

things might have turned out better if it had acted differently or more decisively’.28 The Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung judged the actions of the Fund rather differently: ‘The IMF is a political organiz­ation where governments and not economists decide. If the same situation would arise in future the same decisions would be taken and the analysis would be adapted accordingly.’29 Le Monde suggested that the ‘self-flagellation’ of the IMF was driven by a desire to re-examine the premises of future programmes.30 Indeed, the chief of the IMF’s Greek mission, Paul Thomsen

in The European debt crisis
Abstract only
Thoreau in the city

resistant practice. Resistant, not necessarily in a clichéd anti-​capitalist way, but in a way that genuinely seeks huge changes in the logic behind society’s running. Key to this idealism and wilful naivety is the desire and vision to remove thrift from moralising individualistic rationales and make it more communal; in short, to make it a tool in new structures of social solidarity. The reclamation of thrift must, then, be one that removes it from moralistic historical discourses  –​both early modern and contemporary. Its linkages to ‘moral behaviour’, whether through

in A brief history of thrift

whether the remarks concerning an IMF solution were motivated by a desire to indicate decisiveness on the part of the government, or were directed at the EMU to suggest Greece had options elsewhere. The Greek government had been in contact with the now former head of the IMF, Dominique Strauss-Kahn. Discussions concerning the possibility of IMF intervention had taken place. In an interview on French television, Strauss-Kahn himself mentioned that ­Papandreou had requested the intervention of the IMF in December 2010. The chief of the IMF had, however, advised him to

in The European debt crisis

Papandreou announced his strong desire to lead a European initiative with regard to eurobonds. He assigned the implementation of this proposal to a Special Parliamentary Committee of PASOK MPs. His initiative fell on deaf ears and was quietly abandoned. It was obvious that the other countries had no desire to undertake the repayment of Greek debts. Intense arguments continued over the matter of debt restructuring. The basic principles of its management had already been resolved. However, in the second half of 2011, Germany asserted that the crisis could not be overcome

in The European debt crisis
Open Access (free)

practical benefits. Indeed, when people are consciously searching for a theory which will account for some puzzling phenomenon, or for an effective product design, they often work on the principle that ‘if it looks right, it is right’. Schlicht provides some examples from modern science; and Smith’s detailed account of the succession of cosmological theories incorporates repeated attention to the significance of aesthetic criteria, for example in the desire of Copernicus to incorporate the heavenly bodies within ‘a new system, that these, the noblest works of nature

in Market relations and the competitive process