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order to practise according to their ideals, this attitude of inclusiveness should be reflected in environmentalists’ use of CMC. Yet many groups have to compromise between their principle of inclusivity and the need for efficiency. Environmentalists at times have to moderate their desire for participation according to the more immediate pressures of meeting campaigning demands. This chapter examines how environmentalists’ attitudes towards inclusion are translated into their use of CMC. By analysis of how they have secured and shared access to the technology it

in Cyberprotest

unexplainable aspects Pat Collins’s Tim Robinson: Connemara of mapping, an attempt to catalogue the ineffable qualities of a place. As Robinson once admitted, ‘Although I have been making maps for a dozen years now, cartography, in the sense of a general desire and competence to make maps, remains alien to me.’38 Therefore, the empty qualities of Connemara mirror the process of documentary map-making and film-making, where the procedure entails ‘a mode of discovery’ without a known conclusion or product. Such a method must be approached without preconceived ideas and the

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
Securing or denying minorities’ right to the city?

challenge capitalist class relations and therefore can be 93 94 Urban gardening and the struggle for justice operationalised as a tool for recalibrating social relations, inequalities and related spatial implications. While there are multiple formulations of the right to the city, in this chapter I  specifically follow Harvey’s interpretation. According to Harvey, the right to the city is ‘not merely a right of access to what already exists, but a right to change it after our heart’s desire’ (Harvey, 2003: 939). This definition highlights two aspects: the first

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice

suburban growth. Broadly speaking, the period of the economic boom was marked by two contrasting visions of urban society in Ireland. The official vision was often presented as the desire for an urban village atmosphere based around walkable and sustainable communities, which in reality was largely driven by an entrepreneurial planning agenda dominated by real estate interests (MacLaran and Williams, 2003). The other vision was that of the continued suburban expansion of cities such as Cork and Dublin (Corcoran, Gray and Peillon, 2010; Fagan, Kelly and Lysaght, 2006

in Spacing Ireland
Open Access (free)
Digital photography and cartography in Wolfgang Weileder’s Atlas

, the topography has changed. Although the land is forever changing its form, the sea, I thought, is immutable. Thus began my travels back through time to the ancient seas of the world. (Sugimoto, 2010: 109) Such a search for the unchanging marks Sugimoto’s oeuvre, and highlights a curious desire to point the camera, a tool capable of preserving the fleeting instant, 118 Stitching memories Figure 5.2  Hiroshi Sugimoto, Seascape: North Atlantic Ocean, Cape Breton, 1996 © Hiroshi Sugimoto (courtesy of Pace Gallery). This figure has not been made available under a

in Time for mapping
Exploring the session space

music, song and dance truly went global. Since 1999, I have performed throughout Ireland and internationally. Many of these trips were not only motivated by a desire to perform Irish traditional music, song and dance but were financially supported by people and groups seeking to promote Ireland to an international market. A 2009 performance at the White House for President Barack Obama as part of the St Patrick’s Day celebrations highlighted the importance attached to Irish heritage and the arts at an event dominated by political and business interests. Other

in Spacing Ireland
Tim Robinson as narrative scholar

ultimately achieved, and is moreover recognized as unachievable’.29 In the Connemara trilogy there seems to be an elegiac tone attached to this impossibility, not because Robinson seeks or even desires this unity, but because of the effect of this fracture on the earth: As to our own effects on the ground we stand on, our powers of creative destruction and destructive creativity are enmeshed inextricably … A new species has arrived, carrying a dreadful weapon, the intellect. An arms race has begun, the axe evolves from stone to bronze to iron to steel. Great woods with all

in Unfolding Irish landscapes
Abstract only
A new politics of protest?

the desire to trigger change offline, within society, rather than engage solely in online activities. Extending control The interviewees were able to foster control over the use of CMC, and so provided an additional (and extensive) channel through which they could proliferate their message(s). They had such control over traditional avenues of alternative media, but CMC was cheaper, quicker and enabled distribution to an international audience. Furthermore, CMC reinforced some environmentalists’ aims of organising by employing non-hierarchical structures, enabling

in Cyberprotest
Ireland’s grassroots food growing movement

‘particular struggles at particular places at particular times’. However, this transition is not smooth in practice. While there may be a desire for systemic change, alternative movements face serious challenges: ‘the possibility of alternatives does not necessarily lead to the construction of materially effective and socially widespread “spaces of hope” as they may be diminished by material inadequacy, reform of mainstream principles or incorporation into the mainstream’ (Lee and Leyshon, 2003: 193). Goodman (2000) drew on Harvey to assess changes in organic and

in Spacing Ireland
Abstract only
Postcolonialism and ecology in the work of Tim Robinson

14 Essayist of place: postcolonialism and ecology in the work of   Tim Robinson Eóin Flannery In his 1993 study of cartography and folklore, Mapping the Invisible Landscape, Kent C.  Ryden underscores the necessary interdisciplinarity of what he terms ‘the essayist of place’.1 Impelled by a desire to do justice to the complexity, or ‘thickness’, of place histories, of place – visual and textual – for Ryden, ‘the essayist of place is at once a cartographer, a landscape painter, a photographer, an archivist, and a folklorist, as well as a storyteller … [and] a

in Unfolding Irish landscapes