Search results

Abstract only
Cosmography and chorography

example, a way of approaching coastal space, which Elizabeth Jane Bellamy has described as the possible site of ‘a numinous poetics’ in Spenser’s poem. 4 Spenser’s Knight of Chastity is famously good at crossing thresholds and the origins of her quest are located using both the contours of regional Welsh geography and an unusual interest in the names of places. 5 In order to sound Glauce’s meaning when she avows to her charge that she will try ‘by wrong or right/ To compas [her] desire, and find that loued knight’ (III.ii.46), I connect Spenser’s regional descriptions

in Edmund Spenser and the romance of space

London house from the fourteenth century’. 14 The bedchamber is an indispensable place for privacy – either solitude or the mutual privacy that lovers seek. Chaucer’s Troilus uses his chamber for solitary swooning and delicious death-wishing despair. When smitten by Criseyde, Troilus’s first thought is to ‘hiden his desir in muwe’ (I.381). He ‘muwes’ his desire – locks it up in the small cage to which

in Love, history and emotion in Chaucer and Shakespeare
Abstract only

monument, ensuring the perpetuation not only of his works but of his own views regarding their significance. Yet Jonson’s decisions to declare his plays ‘works’ – for which he was mocked by some of his contemporaries – represent more than just an effort to fashion his authorial self. They also illustrate what Joseph Loewenstein has termed Jonson’s ‘possessive’ authorship. 8 Examining the pre-history of copyright, Loewenstein argues for a connection between the phenomenon of print authorship and the growing desire among early modern print authors to retain control of

in English literary afterlives
Abstract only
Spenser, Donne, and the philosophic poem

earthly and divine love and beauty offer a dialectical meditation on the relations between matter and form, human and divine, mutability and eternity as they dramatize a desire to uncover the underlying order of the universe. Drawing together aesthetics and cosmology, they suggest that the individual mind makes sense of the world by seeking its ‘Paterne’ ( An Hymne in Honour of Beautie ( HB ), lines 32 – 6), that poetic symmetries can recreate intellectual coherence amidst competing philosophic paradigms. 21 In the final hymn to Heavenly Beautie ( HHB ), Spenser

in Spenser and Donne
Aspects of Ramist rhetoric

poetry. 10 This tendency is particularly evident in his elegies and verse letters, but extends also into his devotional poetry and even sermons. A cursory glance at his Elegy: On His Mistress (lines 1–7) shows us his range of invention. The speaker attempts to dissuade his mistress from following him on a military expedition, and explains why he does so by enumerating a series of arguments: By our first strange and fatal interview, By all desires which thereof did ensue, By our long starving hopes, by that remorse Which my words’ masculine persuasive force

in Spenser and Donne
Spenser’s Busirane and Donne’s ‘A Valediction of my name, in the window’

Donne’s metaphors. Some of this difference is, of course, generic, since Spenser’s characters dilate in epic-romance what is compressed in Donne’s lyric. But in each case, bounded subjectivity is sacrificed in the service of an eroticism that continually courts its own undoing. I argue that this erotic dissolution exists in paradoxical tension with each poet’s desire to provide an enduring poetic legacy, to inscribe a poetic signature that will represent his distinct and durable psychological and physical character. My aim in this chapter is to explore the early

in Spenser and Donne

dedication to the Countess of Pembroke at the beginning of Delia , for instance, Samuel Daniel complains that he ‘rather desired to keep the private passions of my youth, from the multitude, as things uttered to my selfe, and consecrated to silence: yet seeing that I was betraide by the indiscretion of a greedie Printer, and had some of my secrets bewraide to the world, I am forced to publish that which I never meant.’ 16 Pace Daniel’s complaint, there is a possibility that the ‘greedie Printer’, Thomas Newton, who indeed had published twenty-eight of Daniel’s sonnets

in Spenser and Donne

-Paul’s wanderings took an unexpected turn. In Acts 9:1–2, Luke writes that ‘Saul yet breathing out threatnings and slaughter against the disciples of ye Lord, went vnto the hie Priest, And desired of him letters to Damascus to the Synagogues, that if he found any that were of that way [Christians] (either men or women) hee might bring them bound vnto Hierusalem.’ But en route a miracle

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Abstract only

character of Montemayor’s method is hardly an incentive to insist on the connections. For the ‘strange cousinage of love’ 7 in Diana is kept at a considerable narrative distance: ‘And when all the fower discontented and discordant lovers met there together, it cannot be imagined what we all felt: for every one looked upon another that would not have bene viewed of those eies againe.’ 8 Of course, the feelings are to be imagined – that is part of the desired effect – but they are evoked indirectly, in the abstract, and pictured from a bird’s (or fairy’s?) eye

in The Shakespearean comic and tragicomic

this innovation: ‘This production of Kemble’s [1815] was the first [on record] to reverse the order of the first two scenes, a regrettable change often made since, and occasionally found even today.’ The editors cite three reasons why the scenes might have been rudely disordered: ‘One is the desire to improve on Shakespeare’s dramatic art. A second is the need to get

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind