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Frederick H. White

neurasthenia was one of the signs of an individual’s physical, moral and psychological devolution. The majority of this chapter explores the development of this scientific discourse in order to better understand the context for Andreev’s diagnosis. Following a discussion of the science of degeneration, attention will be given to literary decadence. Degeneration emerged as scientific theory, but was soon incorporated into legal, political and literary discourse. The idea of a nation in a state of decline coincided with other cultural trends which viewed the end of the

in Degeneration, decadence and disease in the Russian fin de siècle
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Frederick H. White

, making his works particularly timely and appealing for readers. Arguably, it may have been this 1.1 Leonid Andreev from February 1901, while a patient at the Imperial clinic for nervous disorders. Introduction 3 concentration on the decadent issues of devolution, decline and deviance that made Andreev so successful. In this study, attention will be given to the way in which the discourse of a private body articulated the general anxiety around the mental and physical health of the Russian nation at the beginning of the twentieth century, providing an opportunity

in Degeneration, decadence and disease in the Russian fin de siècle
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Declan Kiberd

intuit the boom-and-bust fate of a spendthrift daughter and son-in-law. The narrator of the short story ‘Parachutes’, foreseeing the family life of friends over coming decades, thinks that there was hardly any need to live it. Yet, life must be seized in all its limitation. The day may be enough. Besides, seeing into the past reminds many characters that, even if things are getting worse, this is all happening rather slowly. Devolution replaces the more melioristic ideas of evolution, with the distant prospect of humanity leaving mere traces of itself in the natural

in John McGahern
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Manchester and the devolution of British literary culture
Corinne Fowler
and
Lynne Pearce

3970 Postcolonial Manchester:Layout 1 28/6/13 12:37 Page 1 Introduction: Manchester and the devolution of British literary culture Corinne Fowler and Lynne Pearce As the key components of its title suggest – i.e., postcolonial, diaspora, devolution – this volume arizes out of a recognizable and, in many respects, well-established set of debates concerning the reconfiguration of literary and cultural studies in Britain. The association of ‘English literature’ with the West’s colonial past has been a major, possibly even the predominant, concern of literary

in Postcolonial Manchester
Open Access (free)
Crossing the margins
Glenda Norquay
and
Gerry Smyth

English Literature: [Only] two months before the election which brought to power a British government committed to devolution and the most significant Norquay_01_Intro 2 22/3/02, 9:30 am 3 Introduction constitutional changes to the British nation for three centuries, Homi Bhabha with the British Council presented a major conference-cumfestival called Reinventing Britain. Incredibly, the project contained nothing whatsoever about the devolution debate, or how the changing relationships between Scotland, England, Wales, not to mention Ireland, might contribute to

in Across the margins
Open Access (free)
Murdo Macdonald

presume that with the devolution of power to a Scottish parliament and the clear possibility of independence, such attitudes no longer exist. But attitudes can lag behind political reality and from an attitudinal point of view the unthinkability of Scottish culture within a British context is alive and well. One question that must be considered is, how does one think about the unthinkable? Out of this paradox are born the stereotypes already referred to. The model of ‘Scotland as unthinkable’ is easy to find even in writing relating to contemporary art. An illuminating

in Across the margins
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Frederick H. White

importance, and is constantly reminding the people that there are laws in existence and that punishment awaits those who break them.’8 Andreev’s characters reflect the scientific theory of biological devolution and criminal typology. Because they are insane, they are morally corrupt and can commit crimes without remorse or even a genuine understanding of their transgressions. Garshin was one of Andreev’s main literary influences, and it is likely 260 Degeneration, decadence and disease in the Russian fin de siècle that mental illness played some part in their affinity

in Degeneration, decadence and disease in the Russian fin de siècle
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Michael G. Cronin

, including A Family Affair (2000), Suing the Pope (2002), Sex crimes and the Vatican (2006) and My Father’s House (2010). For a useful account of the events leading to the establishment of the inquiry and an incisive assessment of the Report see Catriona Crowe, ‘The Ferns Report: vindicating the abused child’, Éire-Ireland, 43 1&2 (2008), 50–73. O’Gorman, Beyond Belief, p. 286. Ibid., p. 119. Ibid., p. 20–1. Ibid., p. 300. Linda Connolly, The Irish Women’s Movement: from revolution to devolution (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2002). June Levine, ‘The Women’s Movement in the

in Impure thoughts
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Frederick H. White

animalistic wickedness and a predisposition to madness. ‘The genius begins, but the idiot and the brute continue and finish.’79 Andreev no longer views the world in terms of overcoming the Will, but in the context of a devolution of morals and mental capabilities that degrades the wonderful ideas of the genius into something deformed and sick. With overwhelming scientific evidence that humanity could regress, this was a legitimate explanation for the horrors of war and revolution. Andreev entertained similar ideas in early stories, such as ‘The Abyss’ and ‘In the Fog,’ but

in Degeneration, decadence and disease in the Russian fin de siècle
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Below the waves
Robert Duggan

are emphasised: ‘He was shorter than Colin, but his arms were exceptionally long and muscular. His hands too were large, the backs covered with matted hair’ (McEwan, 1982, 26). As we have seen, Robert’s sexist and antiquated views on gender relations are also of a type with the kept ape’s dream of male power and privilege. There is another example in The Comfort of Strangers of what we can call devolution that occurs as Colin watches a man insistently cajole a nervous ‘spindly girl’ (92) into playing volleyball: She [the spindly girl] was gazing into the face of a

in The grotesque in contemporary British fiction