Search results

Open Access (free)
Borders, ticking clocks and timelessness among temporary labour migrants in Israel
Robin A. Harper and Hani Zubida

This chapter explores the relationship between labour migration and everyday temporalities. It builds on the idea of a border as defining a time-space and of border crossing as generating new concepts of time. Migrants’ experiences of time are conditioned by their divergent legal status, their distance from home and family, and their relative power or powerlessness. This is particularly true of labour migrants in countries such as Israel. ‘Rupture time’ and ‘freedom time’ enable or hinder immigrant incorporation into national, institutional Israeli time-space. The result is a vivid illustration of how migrant border crossings are composed of diverse temporalities, between which migrants must navigate both in their everyday lives and as a past-future migrant trajectory.

in Migrating borders and moving times
Nataša Gregorič Bon

because he respects his wife. According to the village ways most of the work is done by the woman while her husband is sitting in the coffee-shop (cafeteria), debating with his friends. Naso paused for a moment, looked into the distance and recited a line from the poem My village (Fshati im) by well-known Albanian poet Andon Zako Çajupi (1990): Lying in the shade, men playing, busy chatting, misfortune cannot strike them, for they’re living off their women.3 With a smile on his face he turned to us and added: ‘Drink, drink! The juice is delicious; my wife brought it

in Migrating borders and moving times
Open Access (free)
Corpse-work in the prehistory of political boundaries
Richard Kernaghan

methods. It was from such moments of shared sociality that Wilson drew in order to explain to me the Shining Path’s motives and justifications. Wilson identified his sources only indirectly as el hombre (the man) or simply un mando (a leader) as if to emphasise the prudent distance that one maintained even now by speaking in less than explicit terms. ‘Why’, he once asked, ‘do you kill like that … I mean, if it leaves people traumatised …’ But before Wilson could finish the Sendero leader interjected: ‘Like it or not people must understand that everything needs to change

in Governing the dead
Abstract only
Christian Suhr

Bilal a couple of things about the rage of the jinn that Umm Omar had described to me. A week before it all broke out in the mosque, an incident occurred during a prayer. Erdam's brother, who normally doesn't attend the prayers, had been persuaded to come to the mosque. He had been standing next to Abu Omar during the prayer, but with a small distance between his foot and Abu Omar's. The particular approach to prayer followed in the mosque prescribes that there should be no distance between people in the prayer rows. The feet should touch so as to prevent shayāṭīn

in Descending with angels
Time and space in family migrant networks between Kosovo and western Europe
Carolin Leutloff-Grandits

. Despite being physically on different sides of polity borders, and over great geographical distance, migrants often retain an active part in their local village space. This locality is thus re-created ‘translocally’ (Massey 1991). However, migrants may transgress a state border ‘trans-temporally’ as well. They not only construct a transborder locality but also a time-space with which to fill it. Family ties across borders, earlier life experiences and imagining and remembering traces of alternative time-spaces all allow migrants to contest the hegemonic spatial temporal

in Migrating borders and moving times
Élisabeth Anstett

. Moreover, is the observational distance so prized by anthro­polo­ gists still tenable when observing social configurations that are so HRMV.indb 190 01/09/2014 17:28:44 Remains from the gulags  191 deeply marked by extreme violence? In distancing ourselves do we not run the risk of remaining on the margins, of missing the true meaning of social behaviours? On a deeper level, how much importance should be attached to ‘axiological neutrality’, that founding principle of investigative work, when faced with the disgust, the fear or the incredulity which sometimes seize

in Human remains and mass violence
Open Access (free)
Crossing borders, changing times
Madeleine Hurd, Hastings Donnan and Carolin Leutloff-Grandits

at historic places. Authoritarian sub-national time-spaces exist in state institutions (schools, nurseries, prisons, hospitals, factories, offices), and therewith structure our everyday life and worldview from early childhood, often unconsciously. Massey (1991) finds great exclusionary potential in the combination of time and space. With advancing globalisation and the use of new communication technologies, the compression of space and time leads not only to an elision of spatial and temporal distances (Harvey 1989), but also to places becoming romanticised and

in Migrating borders and moving times
Christian Suhr

’ (Stoller 1984 : 104) seems to have gone full circle. Doubt is sneaking into my presentation. I am flipping between either incompatible or completely meaningless positions. Am I hypocritical? Have I pretended to deliver the universal truth of Islam to these psychiatrists when in reality I know how partial and situated this view of Islam is? Or am I hypocritical to distance myself from the ontology of my field-collaborators – was this not the only way to get an understanding of their particular universalism? I am not settled in my opinions on this. Perhaps the real

in Descending with angels
Zaira Lofranco

and cultural processes. The chapter analyses how borders are experienced and newly configured in daily contexts of formal and informal interaction in Sarajevan neighbourhoods. It focuses on the cultural elaboration of social distance and proximity, relations of trust, collaboration, reciprocity and affect amongst neighbourhood inhabitants. Ultimately, it aims to explore how borders are shaped and reshaped by the daily interaction of displaced neighbours during the modernisation process that was central to the socialist housing project and is now reformulated in the

in Migrating borders and moving times
Kaiton Williams

-action (Barad 1998) and mutual constitution. My presence was as fundamental a part of their journey - reflected in my place in pitch decks – as theirs was to the construction of my research and my renewed relationship with Jamaica. But it raised the spectre of ‘going native’: the putative danger for an ethnographer to become too involved in the community under inquiry and thus lose the requisite distance for objectivity. The ethnographic researcher is expected to be both external observer and somewhat native. Pre-existing nativity however is treated differently from the

in Ethnography for a data-saturated world