Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 344 items for :

  • Art, Architecture and Visual Culture x
Clear All
Antigoni Memou

subversive role of photographs, when he writes: Question the images. Take them by the hand and don’t let the sweet distancing they offer you vanquish you; do away with the distance’s comfort or the soft indifference you derive from concentrating on the quality of framing, the use of light and shadows, the successful composition. Force these images to bring you to the Mexican Southeast, to history, to the struggle, to this taking sides, to choose a faction.1 In his call to think about photography beyond aesthetics, Marcos not only puts emphasis on photography’s close

in Photography and social movements
Antigoni Memou

the peculiarities of the street life as it unfolds in a demonstration differentiate his practice from earlier practitioners. However, Sternfeld deliberately chose not to look for random images of the demonstrations as they were unfolding on the streets, but instead he carefully chose his subjects posing against urban backgrounds. His decision distances him from the almost random shooting of preceding representatives of the genre, as well as from their inability to define their subjects and their ‘apparent aimlessness and an attraction to drift’.15 Anti

in Photography and social movements
Regina Lee Blaszczyk and Véronique Pouillard

away from the major creative hubs of Europe and the consumption centres of America to a new zone: the so-called periphery and its players. Here we examine a constellation of people and places that are important to the European fashion system, even though they are at quite some distance, either geographically or symbolically, from any European fashion capital. Fashion has always been a global trade. The twenty-first century has witnessed a new phase of globalization made possible by international trade agreements, technologies such as container ships and digital

in European fashion
Remixed lives, reincarnated images and live- streamed co- presence
Sam Gregory

184 13 Human rights in an age of distant witnesses: remixed lives, reincarnated images and live-​streamed co-​presence Sam Gregory What is the role of the ‘distant witness’ to human rights, participating in witnessing at a distance (either within a country, or internationally) via recorded, remixed, ‘reincarnated’ and live video? Within the context of broader democratisation and participation in human rights image-​making, new participants in active ‘distant witnessing’ shape and reshape narratives in ways that highlight long-​standing questions of how

in Image operations
Unity in diversity at royal celebrations
Susie Protschky

–14. 61 R. van Ginkel and B. Henkes, ‘On peasants and “primitive peoples”: moments of rapprochement and distance between folklore studies and anthropology in the Netherlands’, Ethnos: Journal of Anthropology , 68.1 (2003): 112–34, at pp. 121, 129. 62 B. S. Cohn, ‘Representing authority in Victorian India’, in E. Hobsbawm and T. Ranger (eds), The Invention of Tradition (Cambridge

in Photographic subjects
Rethinking art, media, and the audio-visual contract
Author: Ming-Yuen S. Ma

There is no soundtrack is a specific yet expansive study of sound tactics deployed in experimental media art today. It analyses how audio and visual elements interact and produce meaning, drawing from works by contemporary media artists ranging from Chantal Akerman, to Nam June Paik, to Tanya Tagaq. It then links these analyses to discussions on silence, voice, noise, listening, the soundscape, and other key ideas in sound studies. In making these connections, the book argues that experimental media art – avant-garde film, video art, performance, installation, and hybrid forms – produces radical and new audio-visual relationships that challenge and destabilize the visually-dominated fields of art history, contemporary art criticism, cinema and media studies, and cultural studies as well as the larger area of the human sciences. This book directly addresses what sound studies scholar Jonathan Sterne calls ‘visual hegemony’. It joins a growing body of interdisciplinary scholarship that is collectively sonifying the study of culture while defying the lack of diversity within the field by focusing on practitioners from transnational and diverse backgrounds. Therefore, the media artists discussed in this book are of interest to scholars and students who are exploring aurality in related disciplines including gender and feminist studies, queer studies, ethnic studies, postcolonial studies, urban studies, environmental analysis, and architecture. As such, There Is No Soundtrack makes meaningful connections between previously disconnected bodies of scholarship to build new, more complex and reverberating frameworks for the study of art, media, and sound.

From Burke’s Philosophical Enquiry to British Romantic art
Author: Hélène Ibata

The challenge of the sublime argues that the unprecedented visual inventiveness of the Romantic period in Britain could be seen as a response to theories of the sublime, more specifically to Edmund Burke’s Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful (1757). While it is widely accepted that the Enquiry contributed to shaping the thematics of terror that became fashionable in British art from the 1770s, this book contends that its influence was of even greater consequence, paradoxically because of Burke’s conviction that the visual arts were incapable of conveying the sublime. His argument that the sublime was beyond the reach of painting, because of the mimetic nature of visual representation, directly or indirectly incited visual artists to explore not just new themes, but also new compositional strategies and even new or undeveloped pictorial and graphic media, such as the panorama, book illustrations and capricci. More significantly, it began to call into question mimetic representational models, causing artists to reflect about the presentation of the unpresentable and the inadequacy of their endeavours, and thus drawing attention to the process of artistic production itself, rather than the finished artwork. By revisiting the links between eighteenth-century aesthetic theory and visual practices, The challenge of the sublime establishes new interdisciplinary connections which address researchers in the fields of art history, cultural studies and aesthetics.

Der Blaue Reiter and its legacies
Author: Dorothy Price

This book presents new research on the histories and legacies of the German Expressionist group, Der Blaue Reiter, the founding force behind modernist abstraction. For the first time Der Blaue Reiter is subjected to a variety of novel inter-disciplinary perspectives, ranging from a philosophical enquiry into its language and visual perception, to analyses of its gender dynamics, its reception at different historical junctures throughout the twentieth century, and its legacies for post-colonial aesthetic practices. The volume offers a new perspective on familiar aspects of Expressionism and abstraction, taking seriously the inheritance of modernism for the twenty-first century in ways that will help to recalibrate the field of Expressionist studies for future scholarship. Der Blaue Reiter still matters, the contributors argue, because the legacies of abstraction are still being debated by artists, writers, philosophers and cultural theorists today.

Abstract only
The material and visual culture of the Stuart Courts, 1589–1619
Author: Jemma Field

This book analyses Anna of Denmark’s material and visual patronage at the Stuart courts, examining her engagement with a wide array of expressive media including architecture, garden design, painting, music, dress, and jewellery. Encompassing Anna’s time in Denmark, England, and Scotland, it establishes patterns of interest and influence in her agency, while furthering our knowledge of Baltic-British transfer in the early modern period. Substantial archival work has facilitated a formative re-conceptualisation of James and Anna’s relationship, extended our knowledge of the constituents of consortship in the period, and has uncovered evidence to challenge the view that Anna followed the cultural accomplishments of her son, Prince Henry. This book reclaims Anna of Denmark as the influential and culturally active royal woman that her contemporaries knew. Combining politics, culture, and religion across the courts of Denmark, Scotland, and England, it enriches our understanding of royal women’s roles in early modern patriarchal societies and their impact on the development of cultural modes and fashions. This book will be of interest to upper level undergraduate and postgraduate students taking courses on early modern Europe in the disciplines of Art and Architectural History, English Literature, Theatre Studies, History, and Gender Studies. It will also attract a wide range of academics working on early modern material and visual culture, and female patronage, while members of the public who enjoy the history of courts and the British royals will also find it distinctively appealing.

Aura and reproduction in the post-print age
Clare Humphries

in favour of the aura-reproduction opposition. Little is said, for example, about his paradoxical idea that the aura is ‘the unique appearance or semblance of distance, no matter how close it may be’ (Benjamin 2007b : 518), despite the importance of distance to print-informed discourse (Weisberg 1986 : 58) and the fact that ‘“paradox” can be seen to be a fundamental

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking