David Geiringer

advisedly. A distance between the researcher and subject can also serve as a palpable benefit. Kate Fisher’s extensive oral history project Birth Control, Sex and Marriage in Britain, 1918–1960 represents something of a blueprint for this research. 36 Fisher outlined the way that her own identity as a young, unmarried woman could encourage elderly male interviewees to ‘educate her naivety’ and this

in The Pope and the pill
Abstract only
Carmen Mangion

. Benedictine Macaria Neussendorfer has written of the habit as a ‘walking cloister’, a form of protection from secular influences but also a means of evangelising, teaching and nursing in places normally considered insalubrious for women. 126 It referenced an identity that was clearly separate and could encourage distance or attract unwanted (or wanted) attention. It symbolised a commitment to the evangelical vows of poverty, chastity and obedience. It linked women religious to the sacred through its perfection and purity. It could also represent professionalisation

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Carmen Mangion

relationships were secondary. Such individual self-control, in theory, distanced family and friendship relationships and allowed the channelling of emotions to a higher cause, the spousal relationship with Christ. This love was spiritual rather than sexual, and indeed genital fulfilment would have led to a transgression against the vow of chastity. Emotional detachment was intended as sacrificial and suffering was a laudatory consequence. Submissiveness was not simply obedience to authority; it incorporated cooperation, a working together with women of (potentially) different

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Carmen Mangion

say goodbye to them and I remember being taken to a door … the Novice Mistress said ‘You are now going into enclosure.’ Well. So I raised my body, straightened my back and thought ‘This is it’ … and in I went but I can’t remember feeling happy, not even sad, I wasn’t homesick or anything um because you know this, I was coming home, home. 23 But, of course, the ministries of teaching, nursing and parish work usually required sisters to leave their convent spaces. When outside the convent, enclosure was consciously performed in embodied ways: through distance and

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Abstract only
Changing ministries
Carmen Mangion

reforms that result in social and economic inequalities. 14 Much of the North American historiography emphasises a major shift in the work of women religious, charting the movement from traditional ‘works of mercy’ to more progressive social justice. 15 Scholars of Dutch women religious have argued a similar reorientation towards work with the poor and marginalised but have suggested Dutch women religious distanced themselves from the charitable ethos and institutional nature of their past work. 16 This chapter suggests a more gentle trajectory in the British

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Carmen M. Mangion

congregation did not merit a decretum laudis, it was issued with a decretum commendatum, which affirmed features of the congregation deserving commendation. The Congregation of Bishops and Regulars (or Propaganda Vide if a mission country) would suggest the alterations necessary for a decretum laudis. Many thanks to Dr Rosa MacGinley for our many long-distance discussions on this and other points regarding the evolution of juridical and legislative traditions throughout the long history of women’s religious institutes. Authority and governance 217 thought’ and

in Contested identities
David Geiringer

interpreted by intellectual experts who were themselves often male. At no point were the women at the centre of this debate asked to talk about their own sexual experiences and contraceptive choices. In this way, a distance was maintained between the formulations of the commission and the lived experience of Catholic individuals. The lack of female involvement was, in part, a straightforward consequence of

in The Pope and the pill
Carmen Mangion

must modernise. 86 Religious could not stand at a distance from the world. They were being told to keep up with ‘modern trends and problems’. At the Annual General Meeting of the Council of Major Religious Superiors in 1965, the Abbot of Ampleforth spoke on ‘Some Problems among young Religious Today’. He stressed the importance of supernatural obedience in the religious life. Young religious are not only progressives, but are idealists in the right sense of that word. It is necessary for Superiors to keep up to date with modern trends and problems, so that

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Stephen Penn

absent could be used in an extended sense, either to signify a subject that is absent from a place or a role that it could occupy in the future, just as things are absent from us when they are located at a distance, even though we still have possession of them; or second, to signify a thing that could exist at a future instant or time, when it is actually absent now. In this same way, our future perfection and our past vanities are absent from us. It is clear from this that [if nothing existed outside the present] then at the middle instant of an hour each half of

in John Wyclif
Abstract only
Carmen M. Mangion

strongly connected with the English Catholic community and maintained a strong relationship with the English Church, state and people, despite their distance from England. These orders became strong ‘symbols of Catholic nonconformity’ and ‘actively engaged in compatriots’ spiritual and political affairs’.55 Two hundred years later, these religious orders would again be faced with dissolution, this time on the continent. Supporters of the French 50 Patricia Crawford, Women and Religion in England 1500–1720 (London: Routledge, 1993), p. 29. 51 Aidan Bellenger, The Brussels

in Contested identities