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Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

growing tensions between Louis and his three elder sons, and especially with the co-emperor, Lothar. Deciding to distance himself from Lothar, in August 829 Louis put his godson Bernard, count of Septimania, in charge of the imperial household. The backlash followed in the spring of 830. Accusations of adultery between Bernard and Empress Judith, fuelled by fear of the chamberlain’s competition, were the pretext for this first revolt, in which the two elder sons, Lothar and Pippin, joined forces with a group of courtiers elbowed out by Bernard. Wala was one of the

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire
C. E. Beneš

Historia scholastica 1.37 ( PL 198.1088), although Comestor actually says that Nimrod was ten cubits high (a cubit was the distance from the elbow to the fingertips). 7 As in n. 4 above, Nimrod's connection with fire worship appeared in Creation narratives in late antiquity. 8

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
E.A. Jones

anchorite should rely on hand signals between himself and his servants, as monks and nuns do. No one should hear your voice any distance from your window. Even if someone hears you, they should not see your face. Do not stretch your hand any distance out of your window, unless it is between you and your servants. Do not look for long on another person’s face, so you are not disturbed or tempted. It is appropriate

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

the anchorite could participate – albeit from a distance – in the worship and spiritual life of a wider community. The host institution might be a monastery, or a hospital, or under civic control, like a gatehouse chapel; or a cell could be in royal or aristocratic patronage, as the chapels in the Tower of London and a range of other royal and baronial castles. 3 But the great majority of anchorholds were attached to one of

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

. 32 The cave through which St Patrick was said to have entered the underworld is in fact located on an island in Lough Derg, Co. Donegal, and some distance from Kildare. 33 Hibernie silvestri – a derogatory term frequently used in English sources of the time. 34 1 Tim

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
Abstract only
Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

, the accuser, the guilty party and three witnesses’). On Isidore and legal procedure, see Loschiavo, ‘Isidore of Seville’, pp. 12–21. 5 Beardlessness here is synonymous with youth. Teofrastus’ youth partly explains his intrepid interventions and emphasises the distance in time from Book 1. This new and outspoken discussant is named after the philosopher Theophrastus, Aristotle’s successor as leader of the Peripatetic School, who came to Athens as a young man. He figures in Cicero’s Tusculan Disputations at 1.45, 3.21 and 69, 5.24–5, 85, 107. 6 The idea is that

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire
C. E. Beneš

installation in San Lorenzo. 117 Frederick II (emperor 1220–50): this followed a pattern of increasing distance between Frederick and the Genoese, as Frederick had repealed their trading privileges in Sicily and their sovereignty over Siracusa after his imperial coronation in 1220. GA 3.62–6 gives the text of the two letters

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
Abstract only
Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

. But if we consider the form of the virtues, then on every side they are always positioned at equal distances in a sphere, with Christ working within. Here only a beginning of the form is undertaken; there, where there is a city of virtues, 179 it is completed. Hence, just as no one is good in comparison to God, so, too, no one is perfect. And just as no one is perfect, so, too, no one is smooth or well rounded, although a man might be called good and perfect; and if he is perfect, he is necessarily smooth, because he is formed in Christ, ‘around whom’, we read

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire
Gervase Rosser

distance. Each of these cases exemplifies a house with a hall (of two storeys, open to the roof) set back from the street behind a solar (usually a bedroom) raised above cellars or shops. In the case of (a) a row of three tiny shops has encroached into the street in front of the solar block. In (b) there are three booths directly underneath the solar itself, two with doors opening outwards to receive customers approaching

in Towns in medieval England
Abstract only
Gervase Rosser

caps. Some of these products were traded over long distances: russet cloth from Colchester found buyers in the towns of the Baltic and the Mediterranean. To follow such developments, the historian must consult the records of customs officials at the sea-ports, and the correspondence of agents working on behalf of international merchant companies [ 35 ], [ 36 ]. Newly emergent cloth towns in the West

in Towns in medieval England