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  • Manchester Security, Conflict & Peace x
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Daniel Loick

opinions and thus to the creation of a community of interpreters. It is important to note that this is not a utopian image to be realized in a faraway future, but an already existing practice that has proven its capacity to reliably solve conflicts and regulate human behavior over centuries. Jewish legal practice has always been a legal practice in distance to the state and thus a legal practice in which Kant’s analytic connection between law and coercion was never appropriate. Besides his own radicalization of Kant’s categorical imperative, it was the Jewish legal

in Law and violence
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Alexander García Düttmann

since it emerges out of tragedy as the representation of proceedings, of a trial that suspends the immediacy of activity, and since art, especially drama, proves crucial to the law’s effort to attain the kind of self-​reflexivity that alone elevates it above the body and its violence, above immediacy, stupidity, naivety. When the law wrests itself from retribution, it creates a homogeneous sphere in which parties treated as equal follow a distancing and qualifying procedure that leads up to a decision, the settlement of the dispute. Each party recognizes the other

in Law and violence
Towards a re-thinking of legal justice in transitional justice contexts
María del Rosario Acosta López

with and in opposition to fate, and hence, that a critique of an original, cyclical, and “mythical” violence has already taken place within the sphere of the law. By doing this, Menke is not only able to distance his critique from Benjamin’s most fatalistic diagnosis, namely, his identification of the violence of the law with the broader sphere of mythical violence. This identification, Menke argues, leads Benjamin to ascribe all legal violence to the same vicious circularity of fate, and hence, to the same self-​ contradictory and inescapable mythical structure

in Law and violence
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Lindsey Dodd

, it was natural that we youngsters took on board some of the things they said with a certain amount of apprehension.’ Children drew conclusions from the adults’ conversations around them; for Robert, ‘you couldn’t help but think that the same thing could happen to us’. For Michel Thomas, these present wars indicated that conflict was on France’s doorstep: ‘it wasn’t far away’, he said. Distance was construed differently by Max Potter. He was aware of conflict in Spain, Abyssinia and China, but it did not make him anxious as ‘it was so far away’. Was he worried it

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
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Lindsey Dodd

nothing of the air raid, but said of the aftermath:  ‘I have this memory, it’s just a flash really, of seeing all these ruins, where it was smoking, where people were shouting, and Mum was holding me tight.’ Her first memory crystallised the key elements of the aftermath: destruction, distress, protection. Fire was a striking image. ‘Flames everywhere!’ greeted Pierre Haigneré in the railway workers’ housing estate at La Délivrance, and Michel Thomas remembered ‘the factory all ablaze […] a sort of flaming horizon’ in Boulogne-Billancourt. At a distance, the scenes were

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Christoph Menke

question of how law might contribute to create a just society, one must relinquish the desire to transcend law’s violence. For a law that “radicalized” its self-​reflection up to a utopia of nonviolence can no longer contribute to the political struggle against social domination. Law can only have the power to intervene in the existing social conditions if it retains its power. Only a law that can exercise power can be an emancipatory law –​a law that maintains the critical distance, the negativity of the normative, against the existing status quo. A law that becomes

in Law and violence
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Lindsey Dodd

, the sun – but the colours were unreal and foreboding: red for danger, orange like fire, blinding white. The light show became truly spectacular when the anti-aircraft fire (Défense contre avions, DCA) began; against the backdrop of garish colours appeared flashes, beams and sparks. Further away, children reacted to this vision with excitement. At a distance bombing was not frightening; a condition for fear was proximity. Josette remembered the searchlights, ‘which moved back and forth, but when they followed slowly in v 92 v Being bombed one direction, it was

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
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A conclusion
Lindsey Dodd

, in much the same way that prisoners of war and their families provoked a broad charitable response. Donations and condolences flooded into bombed towns from across France and its empire. The government tried to co-opt this goodwill, translating it into the National Revolution’s language of duty and sacrifice. While charitable giving could be put down to duty and sacrifice, it must also be seen as compassion and generosity of individuals towards strangers. But solidarity worked best at a distance. When refugees arrived in quiet villages, eventually generosity wore

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
The critique of British expansionism
Vicky Randall

States suggests, as Bell points out, that he would favour a ‘supra-parliamentary organisation’, a ‘United States of Great Britain’. 42 For Seeley, the example of America demonstrated that a federal union across great distances and encompassing many millions of people was a practical possibility and ‘robust reality’. 43 Countering the traditional argument that federal government was too weak to hold territories together, Seeley asserted that ‘[t]‌he type of future state is shown in the United States, which has spanned a whole mighty continent from east to west, and

in History, empire, and Islam
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Lindsey Dodd

support were developed for those suffering from ‘deportation pathology’, a diagnosis resting on a ‘fabricated universality’ of experience.44 What they had in common, however, was their wartime distance from French territory; little recognition was given to psychologically troubled civilians who had remained in France. The experience of bombing was buried under the moral and psychological reconstruction of a nation. Such historical circumstances restricted the expression of traumatic experience among parts of the French population. Part of the social context of trauma

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45