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James Doelman

remembrance and mourning. These dynamics in revenge tragedy are similar to what I find in the funeral elegies of the period. 4 However, whereas in revenge tragedy the poet distances such remembrance and mourning by assigning them to often self-destructive characters, in funeral elegy they are most often represented as the poet’s own impulses. My contention is that both general poetic licence and the particular

in The daring muse of the early Stuart funeral elegy
Emulation, adaptation, and anachronism
M. L. Stapleton

competitiveness a writer demonstrated toward his predecessor provided a means of distinction. Greene’s fourfold scheme of Renaissance imitatio suggests as much. The reproductive or sacramental type is self-explanatory. Less so is the eclectic or exploitative, the past a jumbled store to be drawn on at will. The heuristic form demonstrates its derivation from its original and seeks to compel a reader’s recognition of the distance traversed. Dialectical imitatio manifests itself as outwardly competitive and in some ways serves as a doppelganger of the heuristical. Greene

in Thomas Heywood and the classical tradition
Abstract only
James Doelman

passion’ of Wye Saltonstall in the 1630s, or in Wordsworth’s ‘power / Of human passion’ nearly two centuries later, death stirs poetry in unexpected ways. I write these final words in the spring of 2020, when COVID-19 has rendered the ever-present but often ignored reality of death so starkly apparent. Whether it is the death of an individual known intimately or from a distance, these moments do ‘break

in The daring muse of the early Stuart funeral elegy
Lucrece and Callisto
Janice Valls-Russell

in a comedic mode (Callisto), that similarly seems to deny agency by inviting voyeurism, yet ridicules the rapist even as it plays on the victim’s naïvety. I hope to show that through the distancing effects of a remote mythical-historical perspective in Lucrece , and of erotic Ovidianism in The Golden Age , Heywood lifts Lucrece and Callisto out of a two-dimensional representation and gives them a voice by playing on multiple perspectives without resolving the contradictions that result from an accretion of different influences. Leading up to the rape While

in Thomas Heywood and the classical tradition
Theorising practice in Thomas Heywood’s Ages plays
Chloe Kathleen Preedy

of deification, demonstrating the effects of historical and narrative tradition while simultaneously eliding the temporal distance between the Golden and Iron Ages by enabling present-day audience expectations to inform the progression of an ancient narrative. 47 If Heywood’s Homer stands before the temporal span of Jupiter’s reign, a poet already mature in ‘the worlds first infancy’, he is simultaneously subject to and constrained by both time and the gods of his imagining. It is the same deities that his words ‘rais’d / Out of the earth’ that have given ‘old

in Thomas Heywood and the classical tradition
Derricke, paratext, and poetic reception
Denna J. Iammarino

. While it begins with the traditional praise and explication described by Smith and Wilson, as the text progresses, it becomes increasingly detached from these traditional speech acts. In fact, as this study argues, the marginalia become more abundant and distanced from its correlating lines, thus acting less as an explicative structure and more of a secondary, sometimes competing, running text. Although Derricke may push his uses of margin glosses, the aims and conventions behind many of his early paratextual

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
Violence, masculinity, and the colonial project in Derricke’s Image of Irelande
John Soderberg

manner of catell behofefull for the land; and for all kind of wild foule for the pleasure and profit of man’. 18 This second segment reads like an enticement to join the colonial endeavor and claim a portion of the riches. Significantly, the narrator at this point locates himself atop a panoptic ‘Piramides’, from which he sees all of Ireland. 19 Just as with the soldiers of Plates IV and V , problems occur when he loses that distance and becomes more closely engaged. That movement occurs when the narrator

in John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne
James Doelman

and foolleryes of the tyme’. However, that light spirit must now give way, as Lyttelton, serving in the regiment under Southampton, 33 has presumably conveyed the news of the Earl’s death to the poet. The poet is writing to Lyttelton from England, and while the elegy focuses on the Isle of Wight and the New Forest, it is clear that he writes at some distance from the southern part of Hampshire (ll

in The daring muse of the early Stuart funeral elegy
Abstract only
Tanya Pollard

of both these dramatic contributes to his broader argument about the Greek origins of public theatrical performance. ‘The first publicke theatre’, he writes, was by Dionysius built in Athens. It was fashioned in the manner of a semi-circle, or halfe-moone, whose galleries & degrees were reared from the ground, their staires high, in the midst of which did arise the stage, beside, such a convenient distance from the earth, that the audience assembled might easily behold the whole project without impediment. (sigs D2r-v) Although Heywood earlier refers

in Thomas Heywood and the classical tradition
Steve Sohmer

supplied the role of inspiration, mentor, and/or collaborator early in Shakespeare’s literary career. Both men arrived in London during the same period and their backgrounds were uncannily similar. Marlowe and Shakespeare were born within weeks of each other in Canterbury and Stratford-upon-Avon, comparable towns some distance from London. Both men had fathers named John, and both fathers were

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind