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A time of hope!
Vincent Twomey

festivals (the old pattern days), pilgrimages on foot to local shrines and celebrations both liturgical and social in the heart of the local community, the diocese and the nation. Joy needs to be experienced communally, and this can only be when we have a reason to celebrate, to affirm the goodness of life and to give thanks to God for his great works in the lives of his people. Above all, we need to engage in the huge task of re-​evangelising the nation, starting with the cities. The Irish Church has been primarily rural-​based; the cities as cities received little

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism
Abstract only
Mark Maguire and Fiona Murphy

. (Interview, 2010) During an interview, Pastor Remba described the challenges of integration in terms of his relationships with mainline churches. Although he worked towards ecumenism, he was also careful to point out the fundamentalist nature of Pentecostal theology and the evangelist mission: We want to do our best to evangelise a lot of Irish people, and when they come to the Church they can have a place in our leadership team. [. . .] As a Church of the diaspora there are a lot of things we have to do to attract Irish people to our churches. Most of the time we look at

in Integration in Ireland
Abstract only
Mark Maguire and Fiona Murphy

schools, which will be ‘homelike’ and friendly places for staff, students and parents to break down barriers together. Several of the pastors with whom we carried out our research continue to perceive a Christian world composed of souls in Ireland and Nigeria in need of saving and are committed to evangelising both countries. More than for the other research participants, l’état de religion expresses their sense of the world. But for many young African-Irish people the worlds of their parents and the existing taken-for-granted ways of the world in Ireland are not enough

in Integration in Ireland
Joe Cleary

practice and the Easternisation of Euro-​American practice. That is to say, in the age of high imperialism, Catholic and Protestant missionary movements headquartered in Europe and America launched major evangelisation drives on all other continents, but, after the decline of formal empire, ‘the West’ has also been busily importing elements of religions from the regions it had earlier evangelised. This importation has been eclectic. Former Christians have rarely converted in large numbers to other monotheisms (Islam or Judaism) or to Eastern religions such as Buddhism or

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism
Dimitrios Theodossopoulos

that were similarly close to non-indigenous populations. For example, Guzman (1966) reports that the Emberá in Bayano who lived close to the town of Chepo10 had already completely abandoned the old Emberá style of dress by the 1960s (encouraged by rigorous evangelisation), yet those who lived upstream and closer to what is now the Bayano water reserve negotiated mixed Emberá and Western dress combinations as they moved into or out of the gaze of Others. Even their Guna neighbours were unhappy to see them with their bodies uncovered (Guzman 1966: 225–6). If local

in Exoticisation undressed
Paul Sargent

employment and education. Although the profile of those working with CYC has changed significantly, its ethos remains the same, as stated in a 2004 CYC publication: ‘For many years students at Holy Cross, Clonliffe and priests in parishes were generous and effective youth ministers. The decline in the number of priests and the reduction in parish staff, places a responsibility on lay people to play an active and leading role in the evangelisation of young people’ (Ni Chionnaith, 2004: 22). The influence of Catholic religious organisations in this area was not confined to

in Wild Arabs and savages
Paul Sargent

evangelisation could become inter-­changeable in such work. The Probation of Offenders Act 1907 outlined the duties of the probation officer ‘to advise, assist and befriend’ the young person. Similarly, the Legion of Mary’s handbook (1993: 243) notes, in relation to ‘works for the young’, that: Competent legionaries, once admitted to the home, will know how to make all the members of that family feel the radiation of their apostolate. A sincere interest in the children will usually make a favourable impression on the parents. This can be skilfully utilised to cultivate in them

in Wild Arabs and savages
The Manchester and Salford Methodist Mission, 1910–60
Angela Connelly

that an enormous burst of asset-building in the nineteenth century left subsequent generations with the burden of onerous debts and maintenance that turned their concerns from evangelising towards internal issues of maintaining existing structures.16 However, these observations still occur within the terms of the secularisation debate.17 This essay will not contribute directly to that debate. However, it provides context to the neglect of religion more generally in social and cultural history.18 This has overlooked the material manifestations of the twentieth

in Culture in Manchester
Abstract only
Eamon Maher and Eugene O’Brien

currently besetting Irish Catholicism. He opines that people’s faith has withstood the turmoil within and without the Church and argues that there are signs of the kind of renewal that was recommended by some of the documents of Vatican II. Detecting these signs is important in revealing the newly opened-​up possibilities (and risks) for a more humble church that seeks to fulfil its God-​given mission to bring joy to the world of today. The re-​evangelising of Ireland will not happen easily: it requires placing more emphasis on the beauty of lived Christianity and, by

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism
Church, State and modernity in contemporary Ireland
David Carroll Cochran

’. On his account, domination of the education sector has also become bad for the Church and is ‘no longer tenable today’. The Catholic ethos of many schools has become watered down, and too much religious education is just going through the motions, meaning Ireland’s ‘young people are among the most catechised in Europe but among the least evangelised’ (Martin 2010). A more open and pluralistic education system can liberate Church-​run schools to be more authentically and distinctively Catholic, even if this means a reduction in their number, which some Church

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism