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A conceptual framework for considering mapping projects as they change over time

foam: the outside of the bubble connects it to other actors. Bubble walls are interfaces, surfaces of exchange, representing continual to-ing and fro-ing between actors. These surfaces are the condition of contingency, as the means by which external actors affect the shape of the map-object. They are also a lens or film that mediates interaction. From the perspective of being within the foam, looking through the film from one bubble into another, the interface determines how neighbours exchange or view each other’s content. Thus, there are two ways in which we can

in Time for mapping
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Renegotiating the Irish border

was accompanied by calls for a return to economic protectionism by some Irish ministers in the 116 Renegotiating the Irish border Dáil, the Republic’s parliament, unleashing a political storm. Aggrieved at its political connotations, Republican politicians in Northern Ireland denounced the protectionist argument as partitionist. While the trend in cross-border shopping was defended by the then Taoiseach Brian Cowen (2010) as nothing more than a product of functionalism emanating from a volatile exchange rate and the demand for value, the fracas raised significant

in Spacing Ireland

, exchanging news, disseminating drafted and re-drafted reports, requesting help and for an electronic fax facility for contacting the local press. The main benefit that CMC was perceived to have, however, was on perceptions of a West Yorkshire group identity, which in turn mobilised members to support campaigns (Allen 1996). In addition, Mike Birkin (south-west RCC, FoE) was developing a south-west regional website on which local groups’ activities would be regularly updated, facilitating co-ordination of regional action. FoE also initiated an information campaign about the

in Cyberprotest
The case for practice theory

) Outsmarting traffic, together: Driving as social navigation. Exchanges: The Warwick Research Journal, 1(2). [Online] Available at: http://exchanges. warwick.ac.uk/exchanges/index.php/exchanges/article/view/29 (accessed 8 August 2016). Knorr-Cetina, K. (2001) ‘Objectual practice’. In: Schatzki, T. R., Knorr-Cetina, K. and Von Savigny, E. (eds) The Practice Turn in Contemporary Theory. London: Routledge, pp. 175–188. Kwan, M. (2010) Feminist geography and GIS. Gender, Place & Culture, 9(3): pp. 261–262. Lefebvre, H. (2004) Rhythmanalysis: Space, Time and Everday Life. Edited

in Time for mapping
Irish farming knowledges

in turn requires a more negotiative approach to knowledge generation and exchange, and thus greater relations of trust within farming knowledge networks together with a breaking down of established power relations. The hegemony of expert and global knowledges over lay and local knowledges in recent decades has drawn criticism. Fonte (2008: 213) argues that: ‘[s]cientific knowledge … needs to be integrated, adapted and mediated by those with expertise and trained in specific traditional and artisan modes of food production, and by those who know the “place”’. The

in Spacing Ireland
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) Although there is a growing body of work documenting political activists use of CMC (see for example, Walch 1999; Meikle 2002), there has been little work specifically on the possible implications of CMC on environmental movements. Several authors have identified that increased information exchange and communication resulting in new social networks and new space for communication could have profound implications for all the components of a social movement (Rheingold 1994). CMC could enable more diverse associations than those in place-based communities and reduce the

in Cyberprotest
Securing or denying minorities’ right to the city?

radical. Despite considerable diversity within contemporary interpretations and operationalisation of the right to the city concept, everyone seems to agree that it is ultimately about recognising the rights of urban inhabitants, irrespective of their nation-​state citizenship or property rights. In other words, ensuring urban inhabitants’ right to the city calls for challenging the capitalist mode of production of space that prioritises exchange value (hence property rights of owners) over use value (Purcell, 2013a). As such, the right to the city concept aims to

in Urban gardening and the struggle for social and spatial justice
Open Access (free)
An international political economy of work

example, the proliferation of credit unions, local currencies and local exchange trading schemes, reveals practices conceived as countering financial globalisation, while also representing spaces that are excluded from ‘insider’ financial practices. So, these could either be conceived as alternative practices and political gestures, or as the ‘mopping up’ of social groups who are excluded from elite practices, and thereby enabling global finance. The debate surrounding the contradictory ‘furthering’ and ‘opposing’ of global restructuring is one that will be significant

in Globalisation contested
Ireland’s grassroots food growing movement

, the rural idyll’ (Leapman, 2010). Growing your own food has become a practice by those seeking something better and different from their food, environment and society. Grassroots food initiatives, such as community gardens and allotments, have long been recognised as spaces outside of, and challenging to, conventional political and economic structures. Rather than relying on conventional economic exchange, local resources are mobilised, labour is communal and materials are shared. In the US and UK, increases in demand for urban food growing spaces have been linked

in Spacing Ireland

. Staff used email to communicate internally.12 ‘It’s actually easier for me to email them, it’s so quick and so cheap for me to send stuff to publications or to education or biology by email’ (Charlotte Cosserat, CAT). This system was not perfect, however, and electronic data were still exchanged on floppy discs when large files had to be exchanged. FoE’s website helped stem the flow of queries to campaigners by preempting many requests for information. However, some campaigners were flooded with email requests: ‘You can end up spending too much of your time responding

in Cyberprotest