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  • Manchester Security, Conflict & Peace x
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Andreas Fischer- Lescano

form 173 Postmodern legal theory as critical theory 173 of the legal subject as a character mask, a personification of juridical relations in which the law must presuppose equality as the legal equality of abstract legal subjects, because the very contingency formula of justice commits it to equality, Menke then proceeds to bind legal equality to an entity that is extrinsic to the law: the polity. Pashukanis understood the legal subject, in structural analogy to Marx’s homo oeconomicus, as the abstraction of the act of economic exchange instituted by a fully

in Law and violence
Towards a re-thinking of legal justice in transitional justice contexts
María del Rosario Acosta López

are promised in exchange for a diminished justice. But justice is understood narrowly here, as punishment and/​or compensation for the harms of the past. The history of the law as it is told by tragedy, in Menke’s analysis, helps to show the inadequacy of this first type of critique. The problem does not seem to be the incapacity of the law to adequately function as a retributive entity, but rather a conception of the law that narrows it down to a retributive operation. Justice as retribution, according to Menke, belongs to the pre-​history of the law. It is not yet

in Law and violence
Daniel Loick

purely on passive obedience. Because it does not address its members on an authoritative basis, therefore, but is directed towards a mature understanding, Emanuel Lévinas has rightly referred to Judaism as a “religion for adults.”15 To connect law with coercion would mean to preclude its study and thus any authentic responsibility. This is also the case because in Judaism, study is always essentially conflictual and not made for a naive application. This leads to a particular appreciation and nurturing of the controversial and dissenting exchange of different legal

in Law and violence
Abstract only
Ian McEwan’s The Children Act and the limits of the legal practices in Menke’s ‘Law and violence’
Ben Morgan

quoting back to him one of the letters he wrote to her (Act, 164). Indeed, McEwan observes how even the charged silence that arises after Adam has finally said that he has followed her all the way to Newcastle to ask if he can come to live with her and her husband “wound itself around them and bound them together” (Act, 167). Being silent together is also a form of embodied interaction. In McEwan’s novel, the law does not protect the judge from the situated dynamism of human exchange, but is part of that complex process. Fiona and Adam’s interaction started with a legal

in Law and violence
Vicky Randall

also prevented any critical exchange among Europeans that could lead to different and disparate views on the Orient. 27 As material for study or reflection, the East, according to Said, now ‘acquired all the marks of inherent weakness and became subject to the vagaries of miscellaneous theories that used it for illustration’. 28 For Said, it is the consistency in the European production of images of the ‘silent Other’ which meant that Orientalism could be easily implicated in the West’s domination of the non-Western world. 29 As ‘European culture gained in

in History, empire, and Islam
Abstract only
Lindsey Dodd

–18 war, so it’s true, there was a fear’. But none of the interviewees highlighted his or her own anxiety. The fear was generalised, belonging to the adult world, which accounts for parents’ concerns over insufficient masks. The distinction between adult and child knowledge is illustrated in an exchange with Michel and Claude Thomas: Michel: We believed [that gas might be used] because they’d used it at the front in 1914–18. Lindsey: But you, when you were a child, did you think about gas? Michel: Me, no, I admit I didn’t really realise – did you? Claude: No, no. It was

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Reproducing liberal democracy
Lee Jarvis and Tim Legrand

their base, rituals can be approached as a framework for the orchestration of specific behaviours that become laden with symbolic significance through their integration within the ritualistic context. Exchanging rings or throwing one’s hat in the air, for instance, provides vital, recognisable moments within many wedding and graduation ceremonies that might be expected by participants and observers alike. They also take on a specific – again, recognisable – significance in these contexts that the same physical behaviours obviously lack in other situations. This

in Banning them, securing us?
Vicky Randall

and Mahometan. This tolerant and enlightened system induced numbers of the Christians who dwelt on the borders of the Ottoman Empire to exchange their hard position as Hungarian serfs, for that of Rayas [subjects] under the Turks’. 68 In the Ottoman Power Freeman argued against such an interpretation of the willingness of Christians to put themselves under the rule of the Ottoman Empire, and declared that ‘this fact has often been made a strange use of by the partisans of the Turks’. 69 Freeman maintained that it was only the Protestants of Hungary who welcomed

in History, empire, and Islam
Lindsey Dodd

sums ranging from a few francs to thousands. Donations in Reichsmarks were sent from French prisoners of war, their contributions boosted by the favourable exchange rate. Jeannine Coppin wrote that her little girls’ magazine offered a toy doll to every reader who had been bombed out. Bombing brought some kind of unity to a fragmented nation through acts of solidarity that were separate from the acts of solidarity orchestrated by Vichy or politically motivated groups like the COSI. The charitable impulse was widespread; common ground was emphasised by the capricious

in French children under the Allied bombs, 1940–45
Vicky Randall

, who lives in Bethany ( al-Eizariya ), as their exchanges reinforce the notion of a shared historical and religious heritage in the East. Eva, enquiring about Tancred’s faith, aligns Jesus with Judaism, remarking that ‘He is your God. He lived much in this village. He was a great man, but he was a Jew; and you worship him’. 43 Eva has read and admired the New Testament but will not consider converting to Christianity because the Church is divided. She would prefer, she explains, to ‘remain within the pale of a church older than all of them, the church in which Jesus

in History, empire, and Islam