Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for :

  • Manchester Film Studies x
Clear All
Abstract only
Stuart Hanson

: In this context the cinema figures as part of the violent restructuring of human perception and interaction effected by industrial-capitalist modes of production and exchange; by modern technologies such as trains, photography, electric lighting, telegraph, and telephone; and by the large-scale construction of metropolitan streets populated with anonymous crowds, prostitutes

in From silent screen to multi-screen
Richard Farmer

contribute to assorted savings drives, collected money for British prisoners of war to the tune of £1.2 million, and placed hundreds of cinemas at the disposal of the War Office so that training and instructional films could be shown to the forces, Home Guard units and the Civil Defence Services.63 This was, as Kinematograph Weekly proudly asserted, a ‘100 per cent war effort’.64 The angry response to Bracken’s mention of compulsion, and also the 69 70 Cinemas and cinemagoing in wartime Britain, 1939–45 heated exchanges that followed on from not unfounded accusations

in Cinemas and cinemagoing in wartime Britain, 1939–45
The creative tension
Jeffrey Richards

commercial stations except for Radio Toulouse had their highest listening figures on Sundays. 8 Despite the reluctance of Reith, who did not want programmes dictated by audience preference lest the corporation’s output went downmarket, the BBC eventually set up an Audience Research Department in 1936 under Robert Silvey, a statistician working for the London Press Exchange, one of the larger British advertising agents, but a firm believer in public service

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60
Abstract only
Jeffrey Richards

was later denounced as Communist propaganda. There were bitter exchanges between De Mille and AFRA, during the course of which AFRA exploded the myth of De Mille the Lux producer by revealing that he was just the host and narrator and only ever turned up for the dress rehearsal and the actual performance. The departure of De Mille was a serious blow to the series and they tried out a succession of actors, producers and directors as guest hosts, among them Lionel Barrymore

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60
Stuart Hanson

films took longer to make their money back for the exhibitor. The price was determined to a large extent by the cost of the film stock as a raw product, but unlike many other products a film can be used more than once. Thus, one of the main impetuses for the development of the distribution sector came from the burgeoning second-hand trade in films and the possibility of exchanging and renting out films, particularly as many

in From silent screen to multi-screen
Stuart Hanson

the shopping mall. Multiplex cinemas, both in terms of their exterior appearance and initially the foyer, communicate in specific ways with their potential users, who in turn attribute specific meanings to them. An analogy can be made between the multiplex and the fast-food restaurant since both sites determine spatially the relationship between consumer and provider, and the ways consumers perceive the site of exchange. In

in From silent screen to multi-screen
Jeffrey Richards

is beautifully conceived and played and involves several memorable encounters, among them a bantering exchange with a crusty old colonel, a lively controversy with the exasperated royal tailor about the length of the Prince of Wales’s sleeve and his cheeky send-up of the dour Chauvelin. Merle Oberon, with her rosebud mouth, lustrous dark hair and porcelain beauty, makes a convincing image of perfection for which a man would gladly sacrifice

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60
Stuart Hanson

-based distributors, which allowed for the complete control of marketing and promotion, and the retention of profits. 96 The economic disparities between Britain and the United States were great and in a very real sense militated against the British industry from the start. By 1926, $1.5bn (£308m at 1926 rate of exchange) was being invested annually in the US film industry as opposed to £35m in Britain. Most of the

in From silent screen to multi-screen
Stuart Hanson

–55. 57 See Box, The Cinema and the Public , p. 12 58 R. Maltby and R. Vasey, ‘“Temporary American Citizens”: Cultural Anxieties and Industrial Strategies in the Americanisation of European Cinema’, in A. Higson and R. Maltby (eds), ‘Film Europe’ and ‘Film America’: Cinema, Commerce and Cultural Exchange

in From silent screen to multi-screen
Jeffrey Richards

evolved during years of touring the music halls, where in his celebrated ‘schoolmaster’ act in a much-reworked sketch ‘the Fourth Form at St Michaels’ he perfected an immaculate sense of timing, developed a classic line in punning exchanges and created his familiar trademarks (the adjustable pince-nez and the disapproving sniff). The secret of both his appeal and his success lay in the splitlevel response of the British audience, blended of a love of seeing petty

in Cinema and radio in Britain and America, 1920–60