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Tattooing, primitivism, class and criminality
Matt Oches

and counter claim, and has been consolidated as part of the public consciousness through fictional, non-fictional and filmic representations. This chapter firstly explores the historic practice of tattooing and its representation in this group of seamen on the Bounty , through Bligh’s sole authored list of mutineers and the collectively recalled second list. These form some of the earliest records of this type of cross and intercultural exchange between European and Tahitian societies but, significantly, Bligh’s reconstruction of these is in the criminological

in Tattoos in crime and detective narratives
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Cross-cultural tattooing in Caryl Férey’s New Zealand crime fiction
Ellen Carter

France by Louis-Antoine de Bougainville (Hemming 2006 : 79), then in 1774 when Omai was taken from Raiatea to Britain by James Cook (Guest 2000 : 83). 2 Both Polynesians were presented in society circles and had their likeness captured by painters such as Sir Joshua Reynolds, whose portrait of Omai ‘inscribes its object with an acultural illegibility, isolated from any coherence of origin’ ( ibid. : 84). This cross-cultural exchange also marked European languages; from the Tahitian word ‘tatau’ stems both the English ‘tattoo’ (DeMello 2000 : 45) and French ‘tatouer

in Tattoos in crime and detective narratives
Criminal minds, CSI: NY and Law and order
Ruth Hawthorn and John Miller

demonised through his callousness, demonstrating, as Lombroso puts it, ‘an inferior sensitiveness’ to the string of murders ( 1895 : 793). There is, of course, a significant irony here. While the viewer is encouraged to look down on the tattooist’s ghoulishness, it is precisely this quality which the show relies on in its audience. There is always an instability in such shows’ equation of prurience with otherness. If the exchange in the tattoo studio reaffirms the connection between tattooing and criminality, an earlier scene back at the BAU

in Tattoos in crime and detective narratives
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Katharine Cox and Kate Watson

, connecting individuals (Lévi-Strauss 1963 ). Lévi-Strauss sees this as a ‘stamping’ of image, self and tradition; however, this process might be understood to be more ambiguous. Rather than seeing the denuded skin as a limit, representing the exterior of the body and its encounter with the embodied world, the tattoo emphasises its place in a field of communicative and social exchanges. Tattoos both reaffirm the rule of law (Connor 2001 , 2004 ; Foucault 2006 ) and challenge it (Beeler 2005 ; Lodder 2015 ; Lombroso 1876 ; Lombroso and

in Tattoos in crime and detective narratives
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

. Francesco’s growing attraction towards Turkey and Turkish people is first incepted in his initial visit to an old hamam . Encountering a frail old man in need of a glass of water, Francesco escorts him to a nearby Turkish bath, where the Italian man – and, by extension, Özpetek – encounters a previously unknown aspect of the city’s culture. In his reading of the scene, Joseph Allen Boon observes: in an exchange of reverse shots, Francesco finds himself the object of a bather’s intense gaze and looks back

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
Tattoos, the Mark of Cain and fan culture
Karin Beeler

exchange which differentiates it from other shows. The tattoo is a strong thematic thread in the serial Supernatural that links the two protagonists and other characters to both radical and mysterious elements; the tattoo is an image that both conceals and reveals. As hunters of supernatural phenomena, Dean and Sam regularly masquerade as FBI agents in order to access crime scenes, interact with local officials and interview victims and suspects to help them solve unusual and supernatural crimes. As federal agents, albeit phony ones, Dean and

in Tattoos in crime and detective narratives
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Queering Islam and micropolitical disorientation
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

articulation of such matters, and willing to concede to inconsistency, which, in the case of diasporic subjects, is a matter of everyday existence. Moreover, critiquing the colonial and neocolonial networks of desire that have given way to such cultural overlaps in the wake of rampant globalisation is one thing; attempting to downplay or erase the effects of such exchanges on actual human experience is another. As we will see through the course of this book, representations of queer diasporic Muslims are capable of making reference to a plethora of cultural and ideological

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
Exploring gender, anti-racism, and homonormativity in Shamim Sarif ’s The World Unseen (2001) and I Can’t Think Straight (2008)
Alberto Fernández Carbajal

socially conditioned to accept the advances of suitors of her same religious background. Sarif’s narratives suggest that, as regards marriage, British Muslim and cosmopolitan Arab communities are too religiously exclusive and that they foster monoculturalism rather than multicultural exchange, although they show how this is not just a symptom of a crisis in British multiculturalism, but that it also affects Christian families based in both Britain and the Middle East. The culturally hermetic character of ethno-religious unions does not chiefly

in Queer Muslim diasporas in contemporary literature and film
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Urban hieroglyphics, patternings and tattoos in Edgar Allan Poe’s ‘The tell-tale heart’ and Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick; Or, the whale
Spencer Jordan

international system of capitalist exchange (Harvey 1978 ). Related to this was the associated transformation of how time itself was perceived; what Anthony Giddens describes as the modern city’s reordering of time and space ( 1996 ) repurposed for economic efficiency. ‘Time was thus inscribed in space […] Economic space subordinates time to itself’ (Lefebvre 1991 : 95). The social impact of these transformations throughout the nineteenth century are difficult to overestimate. It was into this maelstrom of change and adaptation that the literary

in Tattoos in crime and detective narratives
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Speculations of morality and spirituality in Arthur Conan Doyle’s writings
David Beck

’s exchange principle. ‘It is impossible for a criminal to act’, Locard noted, ‘especially considering the intensity of a crime, without leaving traces of his presence’ (qtd McDermid 2015 : 5). 11 On its own the tattoo is open to misinterpretation. Hamish Maxwell-Stewart and Ian Duffield note the anchor was also a symbol of hope from biblical origins, illustrating the potential for misinterpreting tattoos (in Caplan 2000 , see pp. 25–28). 12 Contemporaneous commentaries held that transported convicts had their

in Tattoos in crime and detective narratives