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Stephen K. Batalden

Moscow metropolitan really wanted to promote unity, he ought to support the Slavonic text for both liturgical and home use. ‘If one is to be concerned about church unity,’ wrote the Kievan metropolitan, ‘then it would be more useful for there to be one Slavonic language used by these Slavs and by us in both church worship and home reading.’  10 What this exchange between the two metropolitans revealed was not only the degree to which the Russian Bible had become politicised, but also the degree to which both prelates

in Chosen peoples
A study in language politics
Heather J. Sharkey

fascination for the ‘Bible lands’ in the English-speaking world. 29 The opening of the Suez Canal in 1869 facilitated this travel and exchange. So did steamships and tourism, as companies like Thomas Cook and later American Express devised luxury trips in Palestine and Egypt. 30 European colonial expansion was decisive: by 1882, Britain had occupied Egypt while France was already controlling large parts of the Maghreb. In practice, both powers offered diplomatic protection to

in Chosen peoples
Biblical literacy and Khoesan national renewal in the Cape Colony
Jared McDonald

represent not only freedom from sin and guilt, but also freedom from social inferiority. 28 Claims to social equality may have been momentary, but they were symbolically disruptive of the colonial order, especially in interpersonal exchanges between Khoesan and Boers. For example, three Khoesan Christians, while preaching to the labourers and slaves on a Boer farm, were challenged by the master to explain the singing and praying they were encouraging among his servants and slaves

in Chosen peoples
The letter and the gift
Andrew J. May

accord. Where Jones was eager to clothe the nakedness of the perceived savage as a prerequisite for his programme of religious indoctrination, his eagerness to distribute material gifts among the Khasis betrayed other anxieties. With little else to give, clothes were an obvious bargaining tool. Yet they were not given altruistically, or just to clothe nakedness – their exchange

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism
Joseph Hardwick

attention of historians of the early nineteenth-century empire. On the one hand interest has been shown in the competing networks that a wide range of colonial groups built with centres of imperial power in Britain. 7 On the other, historians have uncovered the great array of personal, non-official and day-to-day exchanges that flowed between colonial communities on the periphery of empire. While empires

in An Anglican British World
Abstract only
Christian soldiers
Andrew J. May

meanings of identity, intimacy and allegiance across an intermediate and transnational space. Letters written under such circumstances of separation also meant that they could ‘articulate so much that they normally took for granted’. 26 While letters themselves were important physical objects and a vicarious means of sustaining relationships, 27 the exchange of gifts also mediated family

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism
Abstract only
Joseph Hardwick

exchange’. 16 There were limitations on the movement of people and information, and structures remained in place to keep the colonial and metropolitan branches of the Church distinct and separate. Though the colonial Church that appeared at mid-century can be easily slotted into a narrative of the development of the modern Anglican Communion, it is not quite so clear where we should position

in An Anglican British World
Andrew J. May

exchange for land lower down the mountain at Bhola-haut where he established a market. The Syiem had been an early ally of the British, and his negotiations were reputedly the source of some friction among his own people, who complained that he was simply benefiting financially from such dealings. 7 Scott fixed a site for a house at Cherrapunji, and from mid-1829 Charles Fenwick assisted with the

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism
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The Church of England, migration and the British world
Joseph Hardwick

communication and exchange. 52 The network turn has also suggested new ways of approaching the history of the commercial, educational and religious institutions that inhabited the British empire. Recent work on imperial academic networks has, for instance, shown that colonial educational institutions were not isolated national bodies that looked no farther than their immediate colonial community. The colonial university of the

in An Anglican British World
Abstract only
Andrew J. May

particular mission station in the under-studied north-east region of India with alternative readings of the interactions between missionary, indigenous peoples and other British imperial agents. Both the hagiographies of the insider chroniclers and the stern critiques of the missionary as colonialism’s Trojan horse have together had a marked tendency to undervalue an appreciation of intercultural exchanges. Missionaries

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism