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Modern housing,expatriate practitioners and the Volta River Project in decolonising Ghana
Viviana d’Auria

hegemonic’. 4 These issues are explored here in relation to decolonising Ghana, and specifically to the role of expatriate experts in housing design related to the Volta River Project (VRP) from 1951 to 1966. In placing emphasis on cultural dimensions, this chapter reflects a more complex definition of decolonisation itself, which is not of political liberation alone (which took place

in Cultures of decolonisation
Life as ordinary
Hugh Morrison

mission contexts, school experiences in countries of origin Recreation Play, home/compound life, friends (expatriate and Indigenous), holidays, celebrations Theme

in Protestant missionary children’s lives, c.1870–1950
Missionary children inhabiting literary spaces
Hugh Morrison

European children – mostly of missionary families – who lived in Darjeeling away from their parents at an expatriate school. 65 A greater tragedy emerged. Six of the seven children of the Lee family (American Methodists) were reported to have perished. Ada and David Lee lived and worked in Calcutta (Kolkati) while their older children – Vida, Esther, Ada (junior), Lois, Herbert and Wilbur

in Protestant missionary children’s lives, c.1870–1950
Hugh Morrison

framed discourse also paralleled parents’ concerns about children’s health, education and future careers, echoing the widely held contemporary cultural and scientific views about the impact of environment on expatriate children. UFC women spoke for many others when they reminded their Foreign Missions Committee that the ‘missionaries of the Church, specially [ sic ] those labouring in tropical climates

in Protestant missionary children’s lives, c.1870–1950
Abstract only
Missionary children inhabiting imperial and colonial spaces
Hugh Morrison

are, of course, other sites of empire that might be considered further, especially the ways in which Western ideals and imperatives were perpetuated through schools for missionary children and other British imperial expatriates. As such the chapter has traversed its way across a period in which British imperialism both waxed and waned, and also within which resulting colonialism was variously expressed. Joyce

in Protestant missionary children’s lives, c.1870–1950
Life as complicated
Hugh Morrison

Indicated by details elicited on: Identity Friends (expatriate and Indigenous), language acquisition, family connections, sense of own identity, transitions, life trajectories

in Protestant missionary children’s lives, c.1870–1950
Abstract only
London and early links with the English East India companies
Andrew Mackillop

the lord lieutenants, the timing and extent of early links remain unclear. Scholarship relating to the Welsh has similarly yet to establish overall patterns of involvement, although a number of prominent social networks have received revealing attention. 2 Participation in one whole hemisphere of England and then Britain’s global empire was shaped by the existence and patronage capacities of expatriate communities in London. 3 Although the subject of increasing research, the topic of Irish, Scots and Welsh migration to early modern London remains noticeably

in Human capital and empire
Abstract only
Jean P. Smith

immigration policies, removing the rights of Commonwealth citizens to live and work in the United Kingdom that had been enshrined into law by the British Nationality Act of 1948. The 1981 British Nationality Act completed in legal terms the shift from empire to racialised nation in the United Kingdom. White minority rule ended in Rhodesia and South Africa in 1980 and 1994 respectively. While white nationalist ideology persists in both nations and among their ex-patriates and other supporters abroad, it no longer has the power

in Settlers at the end of empire
Dakar between garden city and cité-jardin
Liora Bigon

expatriate society, and to foster informal racial segregation between white and indigenous residential sectors. Beyond the official discourse, the popular views of contemporary commentators concerning cités-jardins in French West Africa only strengthen the image sought by the colonial administration. Citésjardins , and especially the greenness of their associated imagery

in Garden cities and colonial planning
From the Howardian model to garden housing estates
Charlotte Jelidi

villes nouvelles . These were established in French overseas territories during the colonial period, especially in Indo-China, Madagascar and North Africa, alongside indigenous ‘traditional’ towns. These villes nouvelles were designed primarily for the expatriate population, and the latest advances in modern urban planning were systematically applied. Indigenous cities not only

in Garden cities and colonial planning