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Sian Barber

• 6 • Theory and methodology The previous chapter has indicated how to identify a topic, a research question and an approach. This chapter will demonstrate how you marry that approach to an appropriate methodology and critical framework. It will also survey a selection of important theories in film studies that can be used to frame work in the field. Some approaches to studying film privilege the archive, others the text, others advocate a conceptual or theoretical framework. Certain approaches favour certain topics but, as with all scholarship, reasons for

in Using film as a source
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Sian Barber

viewed in isolation. These specific interventions occurred in particular periods and this context will always shape the production and reception of these theories. For example, focus on the text has underpinned a great deal of the work in film studies, as has focus on key directors, genres and film styles and movements. In certain historical periods, developments in technology, funding and personnel have heavily influenced the ‘look’ and visual style of the films made and also the way in which films were critiqued and explored. But how does all this relate to broader

in Using film as a source
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Sian Barber

listed in such work to identify other sources which may be crucial for the study of the period in question. In particular, you should take note of journal articles published recently which address your topic of study. Many of these studies will include research on the social, cultural and political background and may draw on publications outside the field of film studies. Using material which is written from a political, historical or economic perspective will provide you with an understanding of the period as a whole and could help to point you in the right direction

in Using film as a source
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Spyros Tsoutsoumpis

Athens during the winter of 1944–45.  2 Stathis N. Kalyvas and Nikos Marantzidis, ‘To Istoriko parelthon os ergaleio propagandas’ [The historical past as propaganda tool], Kathimerini, 21 July 2013.  3 Kostis Kornetis, ‘From reconciliation to vengeance: the Greek Civil War on screen in Pantelis Voulgaris’s A Soul so Deep and Kostas Charalambous’s Tied Red Thread’, FILMICON: Journal of Greek Film Studies 2 (2014), pp. 93–116; v 263 v A history of the Greek resistance E.R. Kosmidou, European Civil War Films: Memory, Conflict, and Nostalgia (New York: Routledge, 2013

in A history of the Greek resistance in the Second World War
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Sian Barber

discipline of film studies, there are also numerous useful publications which address how historians make use of moving image. Within such publications, the idea of film as a source is usually addressed, though the textual specificities of the film medium are sometimes overlooked in a desire to align film with more conventional sources. This work intends to address both issues; it will suggest how to conduct film-related research and also offer guidelines on both textual analysis and the use of supplementary evidence which extends beyond the text itself. This work refers

in Using film as a source
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Richard Farmer

maintain, with some accuracy, that ‘the field of film studies has ignored a rather important component of the film industry, its audience’.38 The growth of academic interest in the people who watched films, the ways in which they watched and thought about them and the places in which they were screened means that cinemagoing and the exhibition industry are no longer the mysteries that they once were.39 It is still the case, though, that if we hope to comprehend how the cinema as an institution functioned within society, we need to supplement the literature on individual

in Cinemas and cinemagoing in wartime Britain, 1939–45
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The role of popular culture between the wars
Christine Grandy

Shangri-la, America, or the Shanghai express, yet these characters produced a similar moral framework that featured heroes, villains, and love-interests. J. P. Mayer, a University of London lecturer, undertook his own study of the impact of film on British audiences, leading to the publication of Sociology of Film: Studies and Documents in 1945. His study includes the responses, in full, of sixty-eight film-goers to questions posed by Mayer within the pages of Picturegoer. Conducted during World War II, his study nevertheless gives us insight into how audiences reacted

in Heroes and happy endings
Sian Barber

an issue of historiography; much of the formal film studies terminology came into existence much later than the films to which they have been applied. Applying these terms retrospectively can be useful but you need to be aware of the problems in doing so. Within your analysis, you must make sure that you select your terms carefully. As well as defining your terms you should be careful not to make casual use of value-laden or ‘loaded’ terms which can carry completely different meanings. For example, if you are writing about film and audiences and you use terms such

in Using film as a source
Stuart Hanson

), Reinventing Film Studies (London: Arnold, 2000 ). 17 Heard, ‘The Magic Lantern’s Wild Years’. See also L. Mannoni, The Great Art of Light and Shadow: Archaeology of the Cinema , trans. and ed. R. Crangle, (Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 2000 ) for other examples. 18

in From silent screen to multi-screen
John Yamamoto-Wilson

Theodor Reik,7 the perception of the witness to suffering as one who actively and creatively ‘beholds’ it, rather than one who merely ‘sees’ it,8 and the application, derived from film studies, of the concept of ‘absence-in-presence’ as shorthand for the failure of male protagonists to fulfil their role – what Sherwin calls ‘an absence in the space the male protagonist is supposed to inhabit’ – at the centre of the narrative.9 A woman’s eye Oh, cruel Nymph! why do’st thou thus delight To torture me? why thus my suff’rings slight? My mournfull Songs neglected are by thee

in The hurt(ful) body