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Anastasia Karlsson, Håkan Lundström, and Jan-Olof Svantesson

of syllable-initial consonants in tonogenesis. Syllable reduplication and prolongation A special kind of syllable reduplication, where the vowel of the base syllable is repeated, often occurs in recitation and song but not normally in speech. The reduplicated vowel may be short or long, sometimes longer than the vowel of the base syllable. Prolongation of the vowel or of a final sonorant is also common. Occurrences of reduplication and prolongation are genre-dependent. Syllable

in In the borderland between song and speech
Siri G. Tuttle and Håkan Lundström

, but the language as a whole is not classed as tonal. In both Minto Tanana and Koyukon, intonation provides most of the pitch patterns in speech. Minto has a stress pattern in spoken language that makes word roots and certain vowels more prominent: in musical settings, the rhythm of words is sometimes subordinated to the musical rhythm. However, this depends on the genre. In those we will examine in this chapter, most words carry the rhythm you would hear if they were spoken. However, certain important words

in In the borderland between song and speech
Open Access (free)
Method, results, and implications
Håkan Lundström and Jan-Olof Svantesson

situations involving social or communal interaction; specific vocal expressions for situations involving the spiritual world. This is demonstrated by the Kammu material, which contains a number of genres of vocal expressions, each related to a specific spiritual context, a specific social context, a specific time and/or a specific geographical context such as a village, fields, or a forest [3–10]. 1 The very general nature of these functions indicates that instantaneous re-creation of vocal

in In the borderland between song and speech
Open Access (free)
Singing or speaking or both?
Håkan Lundström and Jan-Olof Svantesson

of composition in oral contexts. 7 In the English language, concepts like ‘song’, ‘declamation’, ‘recitation’, ‘incantation’, and ‘chant’ are – without being exactly defined – normally used to distinguish different genres of vocal performance. In a similar manner, many cultures use different names for more or less distinctly different forms of expression. In some cases, these different forms are quite clearly defined. In the Kammu language, spoken by an ethnic group in northern Laos, for instance

in In the borderland between song and speech
Abstract only
Waiting for freedom
Liene Ozoliņa

letters asking in Latvian ‘Where is your responsibility?’ (Kur ir tava atbildība?). The stencil made me wince – the audacity of the question! The admonishment! – but it also struck me because it was unlike any graffiti I had seen, either in Riga or any other city. Graffiti was usually a genre for Epilogue 119 speaking back to power, a way of challenging the hegemonic norms both in terms of its message as well as via the illegal format itself. Yet here was a stencil that sounded like some of the civil servants or policy makers I had been interviewing about the

in Politics of waiting
Open Access (free)
Recorded memories and diasporic identity in the archive of Giuseppe Chiaffitella
Nicola Scaldaferri

creation of preconceptions as much as they were creating communities. Many records of southern Italian music, for example, were full of references to the Sicilian Mafia (Fugazzotto 2010 ). The importance of musical practices and sound recordings for maintaining identities in diasporic communities is even more crucial wherever the connection with the country of origin is less clearly defined and the imaginary component is more pronounced. A good example is provided by Shelemay in her work on Syrian Jews: it is a musical genre, the Pizmon, that is crucial to preserving a

in Sonic ethnography
Open Access (free)
Corpse-work in the prehistory of political boundaries
Richard Kernaghan

resonance or echo they set in motion. What they invoked was not merely a general commandment against stealing. They seemed to allude to a well-known maxim that the Shining Path had frequently laid on the dead bodies of its victims so as to convert them into criminal types and thereby serve notice to all who came upon them: ‘This is how thieves die …’ ‘Así mueren los rateros …’ With messages like this, Maoist insurgents transformed corpses into a means of rural governance. Though the warning on the crates indirectly referenced a regional genre of political threat, there

in Governing the dead
Liene Ozoliņa

genre in Latvia where we can pick up key nodes of the normative discourse. In a famous example of this peculiar home-grown genre, the PM Andris Šķēle said on the eve of 1996 that Latvians had to start brushing their teeth and washing their pants if they wanted to succeed in the new market democracy. His was a blunt way of condemning the post-Soviet subjects’ alleged passiveness and reluctance to take their fate into their own hands. These words about the seven fat years coming were alluding to the recent growth of the economy and people’s wages, following the long

in Politics of waiting
Hindu Nadar identities in urban South India
Sara Dickey

‘truly’ are. The uses of history to stake identity claims in India have long been noted with interest by scholars (see, e.g., Ali 1999 ; Appadurai 1981 ; Chakrabarty 2008 ). Janaki Nair cogently describes the spectrum of historical genres at play today: Between the rational and the irrational, the

in The anthropology of power, agency, and morality
Abstract only
Broken relations, migrant destiny
Paul Carter

identifiable context or conversation and on this account readily recruited to new contexts and applications. In my experience, the migrant artist's encounters are similarly promiscuous. It would be difficult to stratify the different genres in which I have played: radio art did not yield to typographical engravings in public places; writing and directing performance works in and outside the theatre did not lay the foundations of a later discovery of my true metier in cross-cultural urban design. A critic once described my interests as polyhedral, referring to the coexistence

in Translations, an autoethnography