Uses and Misuses of International Humanitarian Law and Humanitarian Principles

is to avoid causing more than twenty-nine civilian deaths, because, according to its advisors, thirty is the threshold at which negative reports begin to appear in the press ( Weizmann, 2010 ). Another example is modern flamethrowers, which were first used by Germany in 1915 and became widespread thereafter; in the 1970s, they came to symbolise the brutality of the Vietnam War. The famous photograph of the burned little girl fleeing a napalm attack aroused general indignation

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

Introduction In 2014, a campaign group posted a video on YouTube called ‘Syrian hero boy’. The clip showed a young boy dramatically running through gunfire to save a girl, and it quickly went viral. The video was viewed more than five million times and republished on the websites of mainstream news outlets around the world, including the Daily Telegraph, Independent , Daily Mail and New York Post . It was also shared by the organisation Syria Campaign, which attached a petition calling on world leaders to stop the conflict. There was just

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector

civilian protection focuses on providing material assistance in such a way as to enable civilians to reduce their exposure to threats, as in the often cited example of providing fuel-efficient stoves to reduce women’s and girls’ exposure to threats of sexual violence while collecting firewood ( Ferris, 2011 : 108; O’Callaghan and Pantuliano, 2007 : 35; Slim and Bonwick, 2005 : 89). Projects focused on income-generating activities may

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local

, almost 1 million people who entirely rely on UNRWA in Gaza and over 50,000 Palestinian refugees from Syria now living precariously in Lebanon and Jordan ( UNRWA, 2018a ). Table 2 #Dignity Is Priceless campaign For 70 years, we stood #ForPalestineRefugees as they endured injustice and suffering. 1.7 million extremely vulnerable refugees rely on regular food and cash assistance. Average of 9 million patient visits to our 150 clinics annually. Half a million girls and boys attend our 700 schools. That’s their rights and dignity. And

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Deaths and politicised deaths in Buenos Aires’s refuse

The appearance of corpses in rubbish tips is not a recent phenomenon. In Argentina, tips have served not only as sites for the disposal of bodies but also as murder scenes. Many of these other bodies found in such places belong to individuals who have suffered violent deaths, which go on to become public issues, or else are ‘politicised deaths’. Focusing on two cases that have received differing degrees of social, political and media attention – Diego Duarte, a 15-year-old boy from a poor background who went waste-picking on an open dump and never came back, and Ángeles Rawson, a girl of 16 murdered in the middle-class neighbourhood of Colegiales, whose body was found in the same tip – this article deals with the social meanings of bodies that appear in landfills. In each case, there followed a series of events that placed a certain construction on the death – and, more importantly, the life – of the victim. Corpses, once recognised, become people, and through this process they are given new life. It is my contention that bodies in rubbish tips express – and configure – not only the limits of the social but also, in some cases, the limits of the human itself.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
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forces. 73 There have also been numerous reports of young girls being kidnapped to serve as ‘wives’ or prostitutes to their captors. Children have also been used as human shields. 74 Among those seized in Afghanistan and held at Guantanamo Bay were ‘Afghan boys aged 13 to 15 classified as “enemy combatants” ’, 75 including one fourteen-year-old charged with murder for

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
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existence to anti-colonial struggles, as well as forces seeking to overthrow established regimes, frequently enlist children often younger than twelve and will even kidnap girls and boys for the purpose. 96 This has been particularly so in Uganda by the Lord’s Resistance Army, where things have been so bad that Ambassador Rock, Canadian delegate to the United Nations, described the situation as being ‘a

in The contemporary law of armed conflict

are often trained to be the most ruthless and vicious in their methods. Not only are they made to serve as fighting personnel, but the girls among them are often compelled to become mistresses or prostitutes for their captors. No death penalty may be imposed upon a person under eighteen, regardless of the offence committed. 26 However, in at least one case of a captive taken in Afghanistan, who was only fourteen at the time of

in The contemporary law of armed conflict